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My thoughts are it should not be allowed, it will kill the seabed under and around the farm, put a no-go zone for people and boats in the shore area and net area, allow escaped fish to decimate any wild fish, and the negatives go on. they will argue the plus sides - local employment (false, check out how many "locals" work at other sea farms) and the export economy.
 

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The semi closed farms are a step in the right direction. It must be given the chance to see if it can be proved financially viable.
That would make sense if the current Scottish government could be trusted to rescind their licence if it turned out to be anything like the other salmon farming disaster areas they continue to support.
One could almost suspect that they have fingers in fish pies.....
 

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Just look at the Ewe fishing and the Balgy. Some of the best fishing until the Salmon Farms arrived. Bruce Sanderson did an awful amount of work proving the effect but was ignored or attacked by those who benefit the most. Sorry but a salmon farm would ruin the Leven and Clyde IMHO. Don't forgert too that most of these farms are Norwegian owned and employ not a lot of people.
 

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Given that I live in the Hebrides and have been involved in working on, helping manage and fishing migratory systems for the last 20 years or so, I think I can offer a qualified opinion on the interaction between migratory salmonids and aquaculture. We have fish in the Hebrides (good enough to be fully booked in many cases or reserved by the owners), and we realised that it is better to try working with, than continually arguing against aquaculture.
Semi contained needs to be trialled. The alternative is more of the same, which is not so good, to say the least.
 

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Given that I live in the Hebrides and have been involved in working on, helping manage and fishing migratory systems for the last 20 years or so, I think I can offer a qualified opinion on the interaction between migratory salmonids and aquaculture. We have fish in the Hebrides (good enough to be fully booked in many cases or reserved by the owners), and we realised that it is better to try working with, than continually arguing against aquaculture.
Semi contained needs to be trialled. The alternative is more of the same, which is not so good, to say the least.
This was only a few years ago, How is working with the farmers panning out.

 

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them poor Salmon,look terrible.
the video should be EX rated.
surerly the LOCH LONG,project carnt get any honest go ahead now,as said the LOCH would true @ surely be finished FOR GOOD.
 

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This was only a few years ago, How is working with the farmers panning out.

I work at Garynahine.
We had to do a fish rescue in the sea pool again this year.
There is a historical record of a sea lice event there in the past, long before aquaculture started.
Corin talks about "cruelty" to fish and is mixed up with Patagonia (no friend of field sports).
Staniford was the catalyst n the drive to get seal shooting banned that led to our inability to get a licence to kill seals to protect wild salmon (absolute carnage this year). Also no friend of field sports.
Onekind.....dangerous fruit loops.
You lads do not have the full insight as to what goes on, and I have no intention of telling you. Crack on and campaign for a ban. I shall live in the real world and work towards looking after the wild fish.
 

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I work at Garynahine.
We had to do a fish rescue in the sea pool again this year.
There is a historical record of a sea lice event there in the past, long before aquaculture started.
Corin talks about "cruelty" to fish and is mixed up with Patagonia (no friend of field sports).
Staniford was the catalyst n the drive to get seal shooting banned that led to our inability to get a licence to kill seals to protect wild salmon (absolute carnage this year). Also no friend of field sports.
Onekind.....dangerous fruit loops.
You lads do not have the full insight as to what goes on, and I have no intention of telling you. Crack on and campaign for a ban. I shall love in the real world and work towards looking after the wild fish.
Fair play sounds like you have knowledge from the real world!!!!! Why the hell people worry about angling catches of ray wings and rock salmon I don't know.
 

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Salmon farms are here but their situation has to be strictly controlled. Garynahine sits on a island surrounded by tidal sea. Fair enough but don't think we are uneducated. I dive but my occupation is in forensics and if you research properly you will understand our natural resouce i.e the sea and rivers etc can only tolerate a sustained future if cared for. Working on an estate does not equate to knowing all. As for seal culling - yes when necessary, same as deer culls but they too have a right to feed and survive. As the late Bruce Sanderson carried out extensive enquiry into fish farming he at least had a massive amount of information and hands on information to speak but that fell on vested interested parties who chose to ignore.
 

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Deer in Scotland have no natural predators, indeed some estates feed the damned things! They must be culled since man has removed their natural predators and encouraged and facilitated their breeding. What has happened to seals natural predators? Are there the same number of seals as always but they've moved closer to us because their traditional food source is endangered?
 

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Deer in Scotland have no natural predators, indeed some estates feed the damned things! They must be culled since man has removed their natural predators and encouraged and facilitated their breeding. What has happened to seals natural predators? Are there the same number of seals as always but they've moved closer to us because their traditional food source is endangered?
Seal numbers are probably as high as they can get now. Last time there was any sort of control was when the Norgies were getting paid a bounty per flipper. (you can fill in the gaps). Illegal netters shot a lot too, mostly these guys are dead now.
We used to eat and wear seals.
 

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Salmon farms are here but their situation has to be strictly controlled. Garynahine sits on a island surrounded by tidal sea. Fair enough but don't think we are uneducated. I dive but my occupation is in forensics and if you research properly you will understand our natural resouce i.e the sea and rivers etc can only tolerate a sustained future if cared for. Working on an estate does not equate to knowing all. As for seal culling - yes when necessary, same as deer culls but they too have a right to feed and survive. As the late Bruce Sanderson carried out extensive enquiry into fish farming he at least had a massive amount of information and hands on information to speak but that fell on vested interested parties who chose to ignore.
Was Bruce qualified to carry out an enquiry? Maybe.
The decline in west coast fisheries was well under way before aquaculture came along.
Working on an estate does not equate to knowing all, but that, living in an aquaculture area, having access to data, having fisheries qualifications aside from a degree maybe allows me to know a little of what goes on.
 

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Bruce was well qualified to speak out on the issue. He had many years experience and a vast knowledge base using divers to examine sea beds for the results of farms waste As for qualifications my subject is in forensics and 4 years at Aberdeen allows me to comment from an interdependent viewpoint and not employed in the industry unlike some!
 

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Given the semi contained cages trap the shite before it hits the sea bed, you lot should be happy. And no, I do not work for, directly or indirectly, in the aquaculture industry. But I can look out the window and see two houses where local families with young children live. The mortgages get paid from the wages paid by aquaculture companies.
 

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We have a salmon farm offshore here. Within a couple of years the sea trout were being eaten alive by lice, we've had a big escape and they're growing on twice the stock they're permitted. The worst part of salmon farming is that it directly destroys wrasse populations everywhere and is totally unsustainable due to its reliance on high grade fish meal and oil, thereby destroying baitfish populations in the open ocean. So a farm in Scotland may be destroying the local sea trout stock, interbreeding with local salmon and weakening genetic diversity, polluting the local area with sh1t (plus antibiotics and extremely toxic lice treatment chemicals), destroying migratory baitfish stocks throughout the Atlantic and killing all the wrasse from the West, Southwest and South coasts of the UK and now starting on Ireland. In fact it's hard to find a single operation in the production of farmed salmon that isn't harmful to the environment
 
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