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Other species farmed, and destroying the environment include tiger prawns, bass, sea bream and bassa/pangassa/river cobbler/whatever else they try to palm it off as. Back in the 70s aquaculture was seen as the future to feed a growing world population, but the species farmed require either destruction of threatened habitats or high grade protein (predatory fish such as salmon) or both. Predatory fish (most of those farmed) consume protein and oil pressed from fish we could eat directly. They convert this protein inefficiently into food, with quoted food conversion ratios of 1.2 food to 1.0 salmon. Looks good? The trick is that it's dry food to wet salmon. Hydrate the feed and it will equal several times the weight of salmon produced
 

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Premium Member
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It's not 'did I bother', and you're right about FCR being about 7 to 1 (as I said, several times the 1.2 quoted). I spent much of my early working life in aquaculture, both fresh and saltwater, and the horrors I saw led me to 40 years in fish conservation (mainly wild salmonids). I still have contacts in the industry and methods such as semi-closed containment are only being looked at to combat a 'combination of high stock mortality and increasing costs involved in treating salmon for parasites and pathogens'. There is no regard for the environment, they're looking to reduce costs, and the Scandinavian owners of Marine Harvest don't give a sh1t whether production is in Scotland or South America. If legislation pinches their profit they'll just move elsewhere. Their product is actually poisonous due to the concentrated fishmeal and oils in the diet (with accumulated dioxins and heavy metals), and 'organic' aquaculture is just a joke, due to the permitted treatments allowed. They have the advantages of needing marine conditions found on the Western extremities of Atlantic Europe, and thus provide much needed employment, but at what cost? The whole industry is a con, and the consumer needs to know the 'price' of their salmon in terms of habitat destruction, toxicity and lack of sustainabilty.
 
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