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Hi guys,

apologies if this is in the wrong place or been asked a million times but I'm looking to get into fly fishing, primarily saltwater (mullet, bass, garfish ect.) but also some fresh (Trout), preferably with a cheaper setup but I'm really not sure where to start. I've spun for bass for a couple of years now but this is completely new to me.

What I've learned so far is a 9' #5 or #6 rod would probably be a good place start, and to look for a forward weighted floating line, but past this I'm stumped.

If anyone could recommend any good models of rod, reel, line at a lower price point I'd be very appreciative!

Cheers,
Rhys
 

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Hi guys,

apologies if this is in the wrong place or been asked a million times but I'm looking to get into fly fishing, primarily saltwater (mullet, bass, garfish ect.) but also some fresh (Trout), preferably with a cheaper setup but I'm really not sure where to start. I've spun for bass for a couple of years now but this is completely new to me.

What I've learned so far is a 9' #5 or #6 rod would probably be a good place start, and to look for a forward weighted floating line, but past this I'm stumped.

If anyone could recommend any good models of rod, reel, line at a lower price point I'd be very appreciative!

Cheers,
Rhys
Hello mate. Airflo would be a brand to look at....reasonable prices and a decent selection of gear.
A #5 may be a tad on the light side if you’re casting large Bass patterns ( deceivers/ clousers/weighted shrimps).....
A #7 is generally a good U.K. saltwater/ Trout line class.
As you progress, your selection of rod rating ( dependant on species/ conditions) will alternatively change, to make the most out of this exciting method of sport fishing!
Tight Lines mate! :thumbsup:
 

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There is lots of diferent rods with different weights available, they are generally classed as anything up to #4 line up to 7' rods for brooks and sreams i.e small trout and other species, #5-6 line for 8-9' rods small stillwater/river trout, #7-8 for reservoir trout.

Saltwater and predator fish tend to need heavier lines and rods usually in 9' 9wt or bigger depending on preference.

It all depends on your prefered fish mate. If you want to fish for mullet then a more finesse approach is needed, maybe a 6-7 wieght line max, possibly 4-5 , its hard to say, experience lol for bass or pollack you need bigger lures so heavier line to turn over the lure, 9 wt in weight forward line should be a minimum.
 

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You've listed quite a few species there....and they all need something a bit different to get the best out of your angling experience.

It also depends where you're thinking of going trout fishing. If it's a reservoir, the rod you'd most likely choose is a 9'6" 7wt as a beginner. Don't be tempted into a 10' rod for your first model - they take a bit more handling. If this is indeed your style for trout, the rod will double up quite nicely fo Mullet as the flies will be a comparable size. It will also handle Garfish and you should get enough sport out of the fight to make it worthwhile. As you progress, you will probably invest in some lighter rods for more delicate presentations as situations dicatate.

Bass fishing is however a different matter. It's not so much the size of fish (Mullet fight hard) but the size (weight) of the fly....and to an extent how much water it retains when being aerielised. Small flies can stil be handled on a 7wt rod, but when you move up to sandeel type flies or even a surface burbler you'll need a heavier line and thus a heavier weight rod to handle the fly - big flies have more wind resistance in the air, so you either need more weight or more speed to keep them moving). A 10wt will handle mostly anything BUT it will fatigue your shoulder muscles pretty quickly if you're not used to repetitive casting with a heavy weight rod. On the up-side, they make short work of bigger flies and are easier to punch through face winds if you have a good technique.

If you're just starting out, seek a casting instructor out and buy a couple of lessons.

If I was going to buy just one rod to get started, I'd buy a 7wt 9'6" with a floating and an intermediate line (remember to wash the rod after saltwater use) and go from there. To an extent, a jack-of-all-trades rod but it'll get you in the game and you can progress from there.

Have fun.

SCG :)
 
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