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Help please .!
I've got a penn viper where the spigots worn now
and as the joints are parallel I wondered what's the best idea for fixing it.!!!
Thanks everyone.
 

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Try rubbing the male part with a candle.
 

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You could use the carbon spray to build up the spigot or for a cheaper alternative you could use matt black car spray paint. One thing though is if you use the carbon or paint spray make sure it's bone dry before putting the rods together and slowly build up the layers till you've got the correct width on your spigot.
 

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Candle wax works very well and lasts quite a while.
A light rub all around the spigot is enough, dont overdo it. The wax soon picks up a little dust and dirt, so that adds to the layer.
If you put too much on, a totally loose spigot can turn into a completely stuck one after a damp night at the beach, the last place you want a jammed rod.

It's a lot quicker and easier than mucking about with sprays and paint, imo.
And if you do overdo it, a gentle scraping will soon remove the excess wax!
 

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Candle wax works very well and lasts quite a while.
A light rub all around the spigot is enough, dont overdo it. The wax soon picks up a little dust and dirt, so that adds to the layer.
If you put too much on, a totally loose spigot can turn into a completely stuck one after a damp night at the beach, the last place you want a jammed rod.

It's a lot quicker and easier than mucking about with sprays and paint, imo.
And if you do overdo it, a gentle scraping will soon remove the excess wax!

Thanks Mr F, I didn't know about jamming up in the damp! Something to remember.
Do you think that a cup of hot / warm coffeee would soften it enough to free up?
 

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Thanks Mr F, I didn't know about jamming up in the damp! Something to remember.
Do you think that a cup of hot / warm coffeee would soften it enough to free up?
Hi mate, I didnt mean the damp affects the wax as such, simply that moisture inside the join makes something of a vacuum seal and so the rod is harder to pull apart.

It'll do the same to any tightish spigot, from my experience.

Someone can probably explain the science better than me though, lol!

IF I remember, I normally give the rod a quick wipe on the male spigot before putting it together, if it's one of the rods I know has a tight join.

If I forget and jam it in too tight when it's wet, I stand around at the end of the session twisting, swearing and generally going red in the face, lol...

Saying that, I suppose if you'd waxed it and it was tight, a little heat on there could help to loosen it, hadnt thought of that!
 

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Wax will pick up dust dirt and grit which will speed up the wear on the spigot, this will also get transferred to the female side and be difficult to remove.
A proper spigot spray properly applied will do the job better and doesn't cost a fortune.
JMHO
Ian
 

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Had a problem couple of nights ago - started looking if the rod would fit in the car with the passenger side window open, would of been driving around at midnight like some modern day medieval lancer.

Anyway, managed to get it free, but all this spigot save and spigot 'builders' seem very expensive when all I assume is that they are some rebadged bog standard industrial solution of acryllic or similiar.

Does anyone actually know what they are?

Also I was thinking that an epoxy would perform the same task and be extremely hard wareing.
 

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as far as the jammed spigot, if this occurs. if you remove the butt cap this will release the vacuum.

failing that i sanded down a piece of dowel to fit inside the butt and used a hammer on the dowel to free it.

never had the problem with loose joints yet, although one of mine is prob only a few years from the problem so i will be keeping an eye on opinions.
 

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as far as the jammed spigot, if this occurs. if you remove the butt cap this will release the vacuum.

failing that i sanded down a piece of dowel to fit inside the butt and used a hammer on the dowel to free it.

never had the problem with loose joints yet, although one of mine is prob only a few years from the problem so i will be keeping an eye on opinions.
Try teflon joint save.

The sprays are praps a little expensive But especially the joint save is worth have a can to protect your investment.

The reason they are praps so expensive is they first came out as pole care.
Certain joints may get broken down a hundred times if not more a session.
As the sections can be £200 plus they are worth looking after.
As is the whole pole when your spending anything upto 4.5k.

As are all your rods.
 

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Candle wax still seems the simplest option to me, lol...

A couple of my older beachcasters may need doing every year or so, on average, so never saw the need for anything more permanent or expensive.

As for grit in the spigot, who cares? It's hardly a constantly moving part and a bit of dirt inside isn't likely to affect their performance.

On the rare occasion my rods get serious sand or mud inside the joint, I'll scrub them out properly with a small brush, beyond that I'm not bothered.

They're tools to me, not ornaments. Scratched, battered, eyes replaced more often than I can recall, but they still catch fish!
 

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Thanks everyone for the info. Will try the wax approach and see what happens.
It'll be fine until you get a nice warm day and the tip flies off because the wax has gone soft. Use the carbon spray.
 

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The wax soon picks up a little dust and dirt, so that adds to the layer.
No, what the dirt does is turn the wax into grinding paste which then speeds up the wear even more :thumbdown

Either fix it with one of the new carbon resins that are available (though pricey) or build it up with matt car paint which works very well if its done right and will last for ages.

Wax was useful on tapered spigots but has no place on modern carbon parallel spigots .... plus if you want to ever fix it properly you are then going to have to get rid of all the wax to get either resin or paint to stick. If you have a tapered spigot they are a doddle to fix with a hacksaw by just taking a few mm off the female joint.

A few quid on a tin of paint or joint saver is a lot better than writing off a mid or top range rod and certainly better than writing off a session cos your rods useless. The comment about a spigot not being a moving part is actually incorrect .... every time you put any stress on the rod the two surfaces will move against one another and the looser the joint becomes the more wear that they suffer. Generally wax doesn't stop the movement ... it stops the noise and gives the impression that the thing isn't moving.
 
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