World Sea Fishing Forums banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My string of blanks at Snettisham remains unbroken. But if I only post when I catch something it's going to look like I'm not fishing at all. To be honest, it's good casting practice without an audience of fellow anglers, it gives the dog something to watch, and it keeps me busy whilst Mrs_S has a swim.

I rewound with 15lb braid through the week, and the flouro leader I'd ordered arrived from Amazon just as we were about to set off on Friday - not long after a variety packet of cheap-ish casting lures from Megastore. Friday night I practiced my FG knot to connect the two. It seemed strong enough and didn't yield to a solid pull. About my fifth/sixth cast on Saturday morning it let go, sending my shiny new lure and the leader out across the water. Oh well, plan B and Palomar knot to connect a clip direct to the braid. Mrs_S is being swept towards Hunstanton on the outgoing tide current, and I keep casting, and waiting. We're camped at Diglea for the weekend, so no rush back for the parking ticket. A good hour later and she's finished her swim, I'm still drawing a blank, but there's a bulky tangle of weed less than 10m to my right. Right enough, that's my leader and lure returned to me by the sea. It appears The Old Ones aren't impressed by cheap lures, they prefer to keep the expensive ones (is it any coincidence that of three lures I've lost to line snaps the two cheap ones have washed back, and the Savage Gear is the only one not to have done so?).

Saturday night we're back on the beach to watch the sunset, with our folding chairs, picnic and a beer. The tide's also racing in, but not before twilight. During the afternoon I've knocked up a Texas rig and before we set off I'd liberated a packet of cooked king prawns that were getting a bit past it in the freezer. My logic was that much as there's a line of wading birds racing ahead of the tide to feast on the invertebrates popping back up as the water flows over them, surely there's a line of flatties behind the tide doing something similar over the freshly wetted mud? Maybe my logic is flawed, or maybe they just don't like cooked prawn. Next time I need some proper bait (and a head torch, and perhaps a tide that's advancing just a little ahead of twilight so I can see what I'm doing).

But it's a lovely spot for a blank. And we've nothing planned for next weekend...

Cloud Water Atmosphere Sky Liquid
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'll keep going at it here, and try and grab some time on the shingle at Cley when I can too. I think at Snettisham I need to maybe come off the lures and try bait fishing, although my rod might be a little light (10-50g) unless I try and flit it across the mud with thin, flat lead. A bit of research I've found suggests that I have the right ideas on the flounder, but that I should try and keep over the mud rather than come up over the shingle (Flounders follow the tides to feed: Evidence from ultrasonic tracking in an estuary).

Next weekend the tide looks a little better, high tide the back of 6pm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Flappers in the edge with worm derived baits if weed allows , not really a lure beach but no harm in trying I guess , should be flounders there ! Possibility of a sole or even an eel or 2 , fish it max 2 up 2 down as once the tide hits the flat that’s it , often pick up a flounder or 2 just before it hits the flat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts
I'll keep going at it here, and try and grab some time on the shingle at Cley when I can too. I think at Snettisham I need to maybe come off the lures and try bait fishing, although my rod might be a little light (10-50g) unless I try and flit it across the mud with thin, flat lead. A bit of research I've found suggests that I have the right ideas on the flounder, but that I should try and keep over the mud rather than come up over the shingle (Flounders follow the tides to feed: Evidence from ultrasonic tracking in an estuary).

Next weekend the tide looks a little better, high tide the back of 6pm.
Whilst it's not the done thing, I suspect you could fish perfectly well there with a single hook ledger and a 1 or 2oz lead lobbed out 30 yds or so, using your lure rod if that's all you've got. Hold the rod and feel for bites.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Whilst it's not the done thing, I suspect you could fish perfectly well there with a single hook ledger and a 1 or 2oz lead lobbed out 30 yds or so, using your lure rod if that's all you've got. Hold the rod and feel for bites.
That's what I will try. Even at the highest tide 30yds will easily reach beyond the transition from the shingle to the mud flats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,227 Posts
The bottom of the shingle where it meets the mud is a prime place to put a bait at high tide. Food will collect there so fish will feed there. A 1 or 2oz bomb should roll and settle near that ridge if you can judge your cast to the right area. On a flooding tide flounders will follow the tide up sometimes in just inches of water so when the tide is still on the mud don't be afraid to cast a worm bait very close in. A good flounder or a bass on that rod will be fun when it happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,220 Posts
An altogether great thread this. Original (non) catch report from George is an excellent and a highly enjoyable read. The replies are both highly educational and full of inspiration for a budding beginner, as George clearly is.

Every now and then a little gem appears on this website and this is definitely one of them. Well done and thanks to all the contributors. 👏👏


p.s. an extra congratulations to @Chazza on your PB Bass last week. I'm sure you're still buzzing boi. 😊👍
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Cheers Alan , I was equally excited with the brown both sides flounder I got yesterday not far from where this thread it titled 🤣.. not seen one for 30 odd year here , hope your well boi !!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,227 Posts
I'll keep going at it here, and try and grab some time on the shingle at Cley when I can too. I think at Snettisham I need to maybe come off the lures and try bait fishing, although my rod might be a little light (10-50g) unless I try and flit it across the mud with thin, flat lead. A bit of research I've found suggests that I have the right ideas on the flounder, but that I should try and keep over the mud rather than come up over the shingle (Flounders follow the tides to feed: Evidence from ultrasonic tracking in an estuary).

Next weekend the tide looks a little better, high tide the back of 6pm.
If you do dig your worms there, as suggested, try to cast baits near to where you have dug. You should always back fill the holes but it will still be disturbed ground and will attract fish in the same way that digging in the garden will attract robins or other birds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If you do dig your worms there, as suggested, try to cast baits near to where you have dug. You should always back fill the holes but it will still be disturbed ground and will attract fish in the same way that digging in the garden will attract robins or other birds.
Thanks for the tip. I might get down at the end of the week for a dig before the weekend. If it was just myself without Mrs_S and dog_S in tow I might make a dig-and-fish session of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
691 Posts
If you do dig your worms there, as suggested, try to cast baits near to where you have dug. You should always back fill the holes but it will still be disturbed ground and will attract fish in the same way that digging in the garden will attract robins or other birds.
prob out of range to where the worms are, first 100 or so yards are sloppy mud before the worms start propper
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
My string of blanks at Snettisham remains unbroken. But if I only post when I catch something it's going to look like I'm not fishing at all. To be honest, it's good casting practice without an audience of fellow anglers, it gives the dog something to watch, and it keeps me busy whilst Mrs_S has a swim.

I rewound with 15lb braid through the week, and the flouro leader I'd ordered arrived from Amazon just as we were about to set off on Friday - not long after a variety packet of cheap-ish casting lures from Megastore. Friday night I practiced my FG knot to connect the two. It seemed strong enough and didn't yield to a solid pull. About my fifth/sixth cast on Saturday morning it let go, sending my shiny new lure and the leader out across the water. Oh well, plan B and Palomar knot to connect a clip direct to the braid. Mrs_S is being swept towards Hunstanton on the outgoing tide current, and I keep casting, and waiting. We're camped at Diglea for the weekend, so no rush back for the parking ticket. A good hour later and she's finished her swim, I'm still drawing a blank, but there's a bulky tangle of weed less than 10m to my right. Right enough, that's my leader and lure returned to me by the sea. It appears The Old Ones aren't impressed by cheap lures, they prefer to keep the expensive ones (is it any coincidence that of three lures I've lost to line snaps the two cheap ones have washed back, and the Savage Gear is the only one not to have done so?).

Saturday night we're back on the beach to watch the sunset, with our folding chairs, picnic and a beer. The tide's also racing in, but not before twilight. During the afternoon I've knocked up a Texas rig and before we set off I'd liberated a packet of cooked king prawns that were getting a bit past it in the freezer. My logic was that much as there's a line of wading birds racing ahead of the tide to feast on the invertebrates popping back up as the water flows over them, surely there's a line of flatties behind the tide doing something similar over the freshly wetted mud? Maybe my logic is flawed, or maybe they just don't like cooked prawn. Next time I need some proper bait (and a head torch, and perhaps a tide that's advancing just a little ahead of twilight so I can see what I'm doing).

But it's a lovely spot for a blank. And we've nothing planned for next weekend...

View attachment 1372485
If you walk about half a mile towards Heacham you'll find half an acre or so of mussel beds right in front of the sea wall. You might also blank there (I have) but at least you feel like you've got a bit of a feature in front of you.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top