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Having 'mastered' casting with a multi in day - moved onto night casting ie. you cant see the lead land at night :unsure:

However, learning fast to understand the multi and noises and sounds it makes on its journey :)
Learned to watch the spool spin and ignore the lead and break at the right moment ... so far so good ...

Question 1 is - should you be breaking to a dead stop or just slow it down ?

I have also noticed that trying to break the spool, it will always rotate a few times no matter how hard you break due to intertia of the lead etc. Will this braking with a thumb burn the line through friction :g:

I went through a phase of thumb against the spool and apart from a burnt thumb - the line would just snap with hand strength & any slight snag .... worried that braking will cause the same problem ....

Q2 - To aleviate any friction on the line - which is better - bare thumb or rubber ?

Ta guys ...
 

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If you gently thumb the spool towards the end of the cast, you can feel when the lead hits the water, when it does Stop it Dead! It will stop straight away if you clamp down on it hard. Be butch with it! :D Be hesitant and you'll get burned or end up with a tangle. ;)

Do this and question 2 is irrelevant! :clap2:
 

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until recently i always slowed it down some, always too damned soon as i feel the spool continue to run, and of course, stop prematurely,

after watching a few tourny casting video's, i noticed they don't stop it until it's hit the lead lands,

so i tried it, it's a bit scary at first, but now at night, my spool runs for a good few seconds longer than it was allowed to before, sure the spool over-runs, but nowt that can't be unwound in a few turns or so, just listen to it, watch it, and stop it dead as it begins to over-run,
 

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until recently i always slowed it down some, always too damned soon as i feel the spool continue to run, and of course, stop prematurely,

after watching a few tourny casting video's, i noticed they don't stop it until it's hit the lead lands,

so i tried it, it's a bit scary at first, but now at night, my spool runs for a good few seconds longer than it was allowed to before, sure the spool over-runs, but nowt that can't be unwound in a few turns or so, just listen to it, watch it, and stop it dead as it begins to over-run,
thats what i do, even in the daytime. it can make all the difference if you need every yard you can get.
 

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A good idea is to cut the fingers off a set of heavy rubber gardening gloves and use those as thumb guards, I wouldn't attempt to stop the spool with no thumb protection and I only use a bass rod with multi at the moment with small casts.
 

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A good idea is to cut the fingers off a set of heavy rubber gardening gloves and use those as thumb guards, I wouldn't attempt to stop the spool with no thumb protection and I only use a bass rod with multi at the moment with small casts.
i've never found the need for one, not only that, but if the line begins to fluff, you can't feel it with a thick bit of material, so a gently bit of thumbing is outta the question,

when casting, i have no bother holding it when dry, and when raining hard, i tend to just dry my thumbs and the spool (where my thumb goes) with a towel, never had it slip during a pendulum when i've done that.

re stopping the spool, i only find the first cast get's hot, i usually 'wet' the line, do an average cast, lay the line in the water and retreive normally, then a big cast, again, wet the line, retreive and fish, never a problem with burns or owt,

i guess tourny casting is different as no water is there, though if i'm practicing i'll pour some water over the spool and leave for 20 secs before casting, the water gets into the line then and takes away the burn factor !
 

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I've always tried at the end of the cast to thumb a bit of the spool (whether plastic or metal) with my bare thumb rather than the nylon.
I thumb quite lightly and find that is enough to prevent a birds nest and i don't get a burned thumb.
rubber grippers/sections of rubber gloves are just for grip at the start of the cast (just before I lift the thumb from the line)

I'll usually press harder (for less than a quarter of a second) when I hear, feel or see the lead touch down (in a field, you can actually feel a "thump" travel back up the mono to the rod, even though the line is in a great big curve) to avoid a few loose coils, but

if fishing in a strong tide I will immediately go back to very-light thumbing to let plenty of slack off so the wired lead can dig in.

By the way, have you noticed that if you are doing a fairly long cast the line coming off the reel slows down 2/3 of the way through the cast and then speeds up again ? I guess this is the lead slowing at the top of it's trajectory and then speeding up again as gravity takes hold ( ? )
 
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