World Sea Fishing Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,014 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i there am thinking of buying a little 16 ft mayland fishing boat in goo condition anyone got any advice tips setups etc that could be good, any advice welcome dont want to spend bundles just a littl e runner round bought for calm days of the shore not to far out need trailer etc any ideas
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,533 Posts
i there am thinking of buying a little 16 ft mayland fishing boat in goo condition anyone got any advice tips setups etc that could be good, any advice welcome dont want to spend bundles just a littl e runner round bought for calm days of the shore not to far out need trailer etc any ideas
Tips and advice: have a look at loads of boats before you part with any cash. There are some terrible boats being offered cheaply, and you wouldn't want one that falls to bits. Make sure the trailer is in roadworthy condition, and also make absolutely sure the engine runs sweetly. Best to have someone who knows what they are doing come with you to look at one you want to buy. In your budget you will need to put a lot aside for the extras things you will need: inshore flare pack, vhf radio, lifejackets, (vhf operaters course and exam), anchor, ropes, fishfinder, charts for the local area, plus other bits which won't cost too much but you must carry them - bucket, torch, first aid kit, tool kit for the engine, paddle, air horn. Have a look at the book on my web site, much of what you need is described in it. If you just want an engine to potter about at a few knots, say 10HP, it will be a lot cheaper to buy and run than one that will put the boat on the plane and give you a speedboat ride - 40HP plus. I hope that helps for a start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,014 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
thanks for the info to be honest not really needing fish finder and all other bits like that as i only plan on using it on flat calm days only half a mile if that of shore of my local fishing spot(Minnis), dont plan on doing any real deep sea fishing more of just a little bit of fun close to shore, if that makes any sense, obviously i no safty has to come first
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,533 Posts
This might seem daft but you can still get into trouble half a mile from shore on a flat calm day. The father of a good friend was drowned in exactly those circumstances. Don't skimp on the safety gear, there is not much on that list I would leave behind even when I go out in my little dinghy.
 
G

·
I also lost my father, brother and 2 other family members 100 yards off Rye harbour in 1976, so please bear in mind it is not the distance from land or even the depth of water (they could have stood up if the current had let them) that could end your life. All safety equipment is essential and even a fishfinder is pretty important, not so much for finding fish but showing the contours of the bottom which make such a difference to tidal flows and currents.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
820 Posts
I also lost my father, brother and 2 other family members 100 yards off Rye harbour in 1976, so please bear in mind it is not the distance from land or even the depth of water (they could have stood up if the current had let them) that could end your life. All safety equipment is essential and even a fishfinder is pretty important, not so much for finding fish but showing the contours of the bottom which make such a difference to tidal flows and currents.

Get the gear creedy. A fishfinder can be had for around £50-70 that will do the job well enough. The other safety gear is not that expensive and is an essential.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,557 Posts
Please don't take this the wrong way, it is not mean as a personal pop. I hate this type of thread with a passion. I am only going half a mile out in flat calm weather. As soon as I read that it makes my skin crawl.

The most dangerous bit of sea is the first half mile, it is whee the sea builds up and waves break, it is also where the majority of rocks are to be found that will spoil your day big time if you find them. If you have 100 foot of water beneath you and open sea the wavel will be long and your boat will ride over them. In the same weather conditions close to shore where the water is only 10 feet deep those same waves will be breaking and could swamp or flip your boat. Add in a couple of headlands and banks and the reflected waves will make for a confused sea with very short waves and the potential to spoil your day big time. Add in to this a tidal current and you could be going out in a flat calm sea, however as soon as the tide turns in a matter of 30 minutes and that calm sea will turn wicked if the wind is now against the tide.

I bet if you got all the stats from the RNLI the first mile of our coast where they get most of their call outs.

Please equip youself for going to sea, have all the safety gear you think you need to go 20 miles out, there really is no distance at sea that requires less in preparation, safety or experience, just because you are only going out half a mile does not mean you will need any less experience,safety gear nor seaworthyness of your boat, in fact I would argue you need more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,014 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
ok chaps i now completly agree with u all will spend more money on making sure i have the nessceties and wont be so nieve about only going close in, really good to hear from people who actully have baoting experince as this would proberly be my first boat and i really apprcaite ur thoughts, many thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Hiya neil, Might be worth attending an rya course or something similar. They go teach you basic seamanship along with a bit of first aid and what have you, i believe they run one at Ramsgate.

My main piece of advice would be to spend a few extra quid on a quality vhf, it's suprising what a little extra can buy you. You've got my number if you need anything mate.
 
Joined
·
15,082 Posts
Please don't take this the wrong way, it is not mean as a personal pop. I hate this type of thread with a passion. I am only going half a mile out in flat calm weather. As soon as I read that it makes my skin crawl.

The most dangerous bit of sea is the first half mile, it is whee the sea builds up and waves break, it is also where the majority of rocks are to be found that will spoil your day big time if you find them. If you have 100 foot of water beneath you and open sea the wavel will be long and your boat will ride over them. In the same weather conditions close to shore where the water is only 10 feet deep those same waves will be breaking and could swamp or flip your boat. Add in a couple of headlands and banks and the reflected waves will make for a confused sea with very short waves and the potential to spoil your day big time. Add in to this a tidal current and you could be going out in a flat calm sea, however as soon as the tide turns in a matter of 30 minutes and that calm sea will turn wicked if the wind is now against the tide.

I bet if you got all the stats from the RNLI the first mile of our coast where they get most of their call outs.

Please equip youself for going to sea, have all the safety gear you think you need to go 20 miles out, there really is no distance at sea that requires less in preparation, safety or experience, just because you are only going out half a mile does not mean you will need any less experience,safety gear nor seaworthyness of your boat, in fact I would argue you need more.
Perfectly put mate :clap3:

Ron
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,014 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
do opligise if i have bought up any bad memorys truly am sorry and i did not mean to start a bad post just looking for information many thanks to all
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,557 Posts
No need to apologise, you wanted information, that is what the place is for.

Are there any small boat fishing clubs near you? If there are go and join even though you havn't got the boat yet. They are a goldmine of information, some will be good and some bad but your common sense will sort that. Offer to help out with petrol and launch/recovery, washdown, bait etc and there will be some at the club who will take you out and that is where you start to learn. You will gain valuable experience and by going on different boats will find one ideal for you.

Get a couple of sea miles and a bit of experience under your belt, check out a few different hull types and then go out and make an informed decision on which boat to buy, you will know what sort ticks the boxes for you personally by then. Everyone has an opinion on the perfect boat but rarely do they agree, what matters is what feels right for you.

Once you have an idea invest in an RYA Level 2 course. You will be surprised how easy it is and it will again build you confidence, awareness and skills.

Leave plenty of dosh in your budget to get the safety gear, and stuff to fit out your boat. If you are buying new it works out in thirds roughly, a third for the hull, a third for engine/s and a third for trailer, kit and safety gear.
 
G

·
do opligise if i have bought up any bad memorys truly am sorry and i did not mean to start a bad post just looking for information many thanks to all
I have learned from it and would hate to see anyone else go through what my family did. I still fish from Rye but always take the right precautions. Better safe than sorry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
I have a bit of advice for you! Join a boat club! Meet the members and find out all you can about your local area. Be cheeky, you may even get a trip out on a few different boats for very little cost, this will help no end in what kind of boat you would like, you may even find you get bad sea sickness and a small boat is no good. Get a lot of information, but, nothing like going out with an experienced small boater or two to learn how they do it! Just as chrisp says!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
I agree with the guys on safety equitment, it's realy important. The see (and big open freshwater) is a hazardhous place and conditions can change in a matter of minutes. Safety equitment is expensive and the chance is big you never use it, but when you have to it's worth it.

But i've also got a tip for you when you go and see a boat. Before you the owner starts the engine put your hand on in and feel if it's warm. If it's warm it will start directly, but does it also start that good when it's cold? When it's warm ask the owner to wait an hour and start it then or come back another time. It's realy important that an cold engine starts directly, eg. when your at anchor and suddenly the horizon turns black.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
mate i have a mayland 16 ft great boat do check the keel on the earlier models as someone mentioned they do sag a little the only downside is the cockpit isnt self draining and requires a bilge pump to keep your boat empty

gav
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top