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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I am looking to buy a boat with my girlfriend... this will be our first boat and we aren't looking to spend a ton of money for a first. Our plans are to buy an older boat ( 70's, 80's ) so we can have an old beater to get figure things out with.

What things should I look for when purchasing an older boat?
 

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Hi jrod, I bought my first boat many years ago after 3 years of saving, my dad told me to go to the end of the fuel jetty and throw my savings in on the ebbing tide, and go shore fishing, he said it would be cheaper in the long run. He was right but Ive owned boats ever since its great, can cost a fortune though even old boats that are cheap to buy cost lots in time and money on the upkeep.

Hope i havnt put you off, and welcome to the site.

Regards Ryan.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I think we are going to drive out today to see it, any particular questions I should ask?
 

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Get a compression test on the engine, 15psi differen on any cylinder start walking.

Find out the last time the bellows were changed on the outdrive.

Take a screwdriver and loosen the lower drain plug on the leg, clear oil should come out, any milkyness to it start walking.

Look for cracks radiating from a central point anywhere on the hull. This indicates stress crazing, could be the result of a collision with something.

Look for spongyness in the deck.

General signs of corrosion or neglect.

Bayliners are lightly built, ideal for the gulf inshore on a calm day. Not in my oinion a good boat if you are caught out in rough weather. Depends on where in the US you are and where you intend to use it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I am in Santa Barbara... we have islands about 10 - 15 miles out. The water can get choppy sometimes but generally it's nothing to fret over.

I think me and my girlfriend have came to the consensus to get something a little smaller... maybe 20'. Something we can also take to the lake with ease but not too small that we wont want to take it out in the ocean. Not to mention, my 4runner or her Grand Cherokee probably couldn't have pulled such a heavy boat.
 

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I bought my first boat last year, and was told "owning a boat is like standing in a cold shower ripping up £5 notes " they were wrong, should be £10 notes. But it didn't stop me going out and buying a new one this year. Enjoy it, you can't beat the feeling.
 

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My advice would be to go out with someone who has a boat and learn a lot about boats before parting with any money. Alternatively, go for a 14 to 16 foot open dinghy and an outboard, learn about boating the hard way without spending too much money, then when you decide what type of boat appeals (fast/slow, modern/traditional, lots of cabin/lots of cockpit, berths for sleeping/no berths, mainly fishing/mainly cruising, with mates/with girlfriend...and the rest), then you'll have a fair idea what to look for. Be aware you have have a lot of fun in a 16 footer for under £1,000, or you could easily spend £40,000 on a 23 footer. I was lucky, my Dad had a 23 foot clinker fishing boat when I was a teenager, then when I could afford my own I bought a 14 foot dinghy, years later upgraded to a Shetland Alaska 500, then a Trophy 2352 and never regretted any of those purchases.
 

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ChrisP said:
That must be the Salar of AN, wondered if it was you when I saw the nick. Welcome to the mad house.
Yup. As far as I know there is only one Trophy 2352 called Salar whose owner can't think of a more imaginative nick than his boat ;) Still on AN, but wandered over here for a bit of variety. Good site, I wonder if there is an archive of the articles as there were some more good ones a couple of years ago if I remember.
 
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