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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys.
I was wondering, do you load your kit into the boat for trailering or is it preferable to keep the boat empty and put your gear in the car if possible?
I'm going to check my trailer nose weight later, when i do that with my caravan, i use the gear inside to get the correct nose weight when loaded, just wondering if this is also done with boats, personally i think i'd rather trailer the boat empty.
AL ..
 
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Do the same with your boat as you would with the caravan. Get the weight distribution wrong and you will be snaking all over the place.
 
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Most people do load gear in the boat to balance it, but this is terribly bad practise.

You should set up the trailer so that your boat sits with the correct draw bar weight on the trailer. Not load the boat to get it right (what happens if your gear shifts when you go around a corner).

The tow vehicle should have as much gear in it as possible (be as heavy as possible) compared to the trailer.
 

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Depends on the trailer, when I bought my latest boat the trailer offered in the package had 65kg left after boat engine and full fuel tank was loaded on it so not much capacity for gear. It was running at almost 100% rated load, not a good thing in my mind. I had my own trailer made to handle double the weight of the boat so it is running at 50% of rated load. I put all my gear aboard for the day and go without having to worry If your own trailer is running close to Maximum load I would put gear in the car to keep the weight down and as you say trim for nose weight wth one or 2 heavy items.
 

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Except that, the load capacity of the trailer aside, the combined weight of trailer +boat +gear should be less than 75% (?) of the weight of the towing vehicle, otherwise, the tail wags the dog.
 
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Except that, the load capacity of the trailer aside, the combined weight of trailer +boat +gear should be less than 75% (?) of the weight of the towing vehicle, otherwise, the tail wags the dog.
Don't know what the % should be, but good analogy, hence bung as much of your gear in the car as possible to increase the tow vehicle weight.
 

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When towing, the most important thing [especially with single axle trailers of any type] is to make absolutly sure the trailer doesn't become hinderly.
Which basicly means you don't put heavey items as far as possible behind the axle in an attemt to lessen nose weight, being slightly heavy at the drawbar is the lesser of the two evils, being hinderly is a very dangerous load and will start snakeing for sure.
TB
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I didn't want anything in the boat if i could help it, the replies have pretty much confirmed my own thinking, don't put anything in the boat unless it can't be avoided.
I'll take out the battery and fuel tank as well for travelling.
I towed it all home 200 miles and towed fine, so i doubt if it's far out anyway, i need a new nose weight guage, so it will be tomorrow now before i get it checked.
AL ..
 
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If you can't physically lift it then it is too heavy.
If you can lift it one handed or with ease it is too light.

...of course there is a bit more to it than that, but not a bad starting point.
 

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I didn't want anything in the boat if i could help it, the replies have pretty much confirmed my own thinking, don't put anything in the boat unless it can't be avoided.
I'll take out the battery and fuel tank as well for travelling.
I towed it all home 200 miles and towed fine, so i doubt if it's far out anyway, i need a new nose weight guage, so it will be tomorrow now before i get it checked.
AL ..
Why not put the nose wheel on the bathroom scales? 50 - 100kg is about right for my 2.0 mondeo estate with self levelling suspension, but all cars will differ.
 

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If you can't physically lift it then it is too heavy.
If you can lift it one handed or with ease it is too light.

...of course there is a bit more to it than that, but not a bad starting point.
Yes, that just about sums it up unless your limp wristed minister, or it's a twin axled trailer.
TB.
 

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Just in case we have some "young ones" in here :punk: check that your diving licence is valid for towing!
If you have past your dirving test after 1st Jan 1997 you will not be legaly able to tow a trailer. If this applies to you then don't forget if you ignore this you will have no insurrance!
Mr.Plod will pick you up with plenty on points to add as well as a fine! :yucky:

If you have re-newed your licence it may be worth checking as the DVLC seem to remove parts when they like and you have to prove that you had this option before they screwed your details up, take a copy of your old details and keep on file ............... for ever! :g:

Dave
:)
 

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Up until this season I've only towed my boat to a local slipway ( 1 mile ) but I intend to go a bit further afield this year. I think my trailer is on the limit, weight wise. It has 750kg rated suspension units. The boat is an Alaska with a 60hp 4stroke engine. I hope to put as much of the gear in the car as possible but I'm a bit concerned about the fuel tanks in an accident. Would any of you be concerned about putting fuel tanks in the car ? Also, I service the wheel bearings each year but the suspension units have been on the trailer for about 3 or 4 years. How can I tell if they are ok. Is there any way of telling by looking at them? Has anyone had them break whilst towing and if so how do you repair at the side of the road. Are there any rescue services that can help in these situations ? Must be a nightmare if they collapse or break on the road !!!
 

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hi billy we had trailor problems towing home from bridlington could,nt repair at roadside ,son has full aa cover they just loaded it up on back of recovery truck and took it home,brilliant. would recommend taking out full cover with aa costs about £90 that covers me &the wife in any car driving or been a passenger hope this helps steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Right, i have 60kg noseweight, that's with the boat empty, outboard fitted and one battery in the back, does this sound about right? i've read varying figures for for noseweights.
When i tow, i will be leaving the full fuel tank and battery in the boat, may as well bearing in mind the current noseweight, it'll reduce that by a few more kilo's
Just checked my car handbook, max noseweight is 85kg, so i'm well in :clap2: hehe i've answered my own question now lol - Car is a Citroen Xantia 2.0-HDI, 110hp, if anyones interested.
Does anyone else tow & launch using this car? if so, how do you get on, with the launching (i know it all tows well) some slipways i have looked at look pretty steep and slippery.
I was going to buy a 4x4 later in the year, but since yesterdays budget, i won't be doing that
Oh, boat is a Seahog Sea Jeep.
AL ..
 

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I towed a Seahog Hunter outfit with an old Citroen BX.
Not bad but front wheels sometimes slipped recovering trailer. Tendancy then is for front of car to edge sideways - so care needed.
Does the Xantia have that adjustable height suspension? My BX had that and it's very useful in some launch situations.
I always carry 50' of heavy rope. Some slipways so steep and weedy you could barely walk on them. Rope can allow you to detach trailer and use car on dry to control the launch.
When recovering at low tide the rope was handy to keep the car well away from the tideline, soft sand etc.
 
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In the early days of the Xantia I belive it won best tow car by the Caravan Club, however they didn't launch on green slipways....


With regards to nose weight as she is I would say almost perfect, but I wouldn't try and reduce it further. If anything a few Kg more would be preferrable (maybe 70Kg).

If you try and reduce it, you are asking for snaking issues etc.
 

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personally I don't see the problem with loading stuff in the boat, as long as its well secured, the nose weight is correct and its within the limits of the trailer capacity.

Regularly tow to north west scotland and the boat usually has 3 25 litre fuel tanks (full) all the fishing gear, a 10foot semi rib inflatable (deflated!!) and 6hp mariner, diving gear, tool kit, trolley jack, and often luggage as well.
 
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