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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
still on the search for a boat my mate was telling me to go after a inboard diesel,
what is more reliable out boards or inboards,
what are cheaper to buy and run
whats the pros and cons on the 2 engines.

cheers lads you help will be great
 

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I've had 2 boats with inboards and had trouble with both out drives so never again will I go for an inboard.

Outboards all the time from now on.

If you want a slow boat then inboard on a shaft would be best.

Fast boat has to be outboards.

Modern outboards are so good on petrol now I would say there better than diesel and cheaper to run.
 

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Marmite
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It depends on what sort of boat he is looking for mate.
Fast fisher will be fast with an outboard.
My dad has alway has had inboards and he swears by them. But everyone is different.
But I prefer an outboard for speed mate. But it's what you/he likes.
 

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its an age thing , if you can afford a nearly new boat go with outboard if your on a budget go for a plodder with shaft drive,, older outboards are an absolute nightmare
 

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Not sure how you all work out that inboards are slow and outboards fast with better economy ?

I have a diesel inboard that will do 30knts with the wind behind. you tell me how often that ain't fast enough, oh and it cruises around a litre per mile, that's 72p per mile, show me an outboard that will push a 24 foot boat at those figures for 72p per mile, I also have an outboard boat that does a litre per mile, but petrol costs a lot more, so more economical to run the inboard.

I am a great fan of outboards, they have moved on leaps and bounds now, and if I was buying new with a tight budget, I would go outboard as the cost to buy them new is far cheaper than the inboards, but looking at the longer picture, considering the miles I will cover, diesel all the way for me.

I ain't sure there is a right or wrong answer, I reckon it depends on your situation and what you want from it.
 

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It seems that over the last 4 years virtually everyone I know with the diesels (commercial sector) seem to be having more and more problems. Im not talking 20yr old engines but engines in their first year of purchase, even the charter boats seem to have so many days on the slip or with a mechanic under their floor. I dont know if its due to the new high tech diesels being overly complicated or down to a less than reputable diesel engine supplier in our area but there are definitely issues this side of the pond.

As for outboards, Ive had way too many to keep count of in the last 37 years of owning boats and only ever had problems with one 90 hp merc. For the last 15 years Ive only owned 4 strokes, from Honda, Yamaha and my latest is a 90 suzuki which have all been faultless. My outboards have done a minimum of 200 hrs per year, if the weather gods are on my side this can be 500hrs of running per year. When you look at most people run 10-15mins drop the anchor then do the same run home you can see I clock up quite a few hrs per year. (mainly from chassing game fish offshore)
JonD
 

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A nice Tohatsu will see you right :)

Inboards are rarely seen now it's all outboards with how good they are now you can't really go wrong..

Jamie
 

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Another thing to take into consideration is buying and transporting fuel.

If you will be trailing your boat then there is no problem in getting fuel from your local supermarket but if the boat is moored, stacked etc. then you will have to carry cans of fuel around.
Many filling stations will only allow a limited amout of petrol per visit and it has to be in "approved" cans. You could buy petrol from your local marina, if they sell it, but the price per litre makes my eyes water!

Check out what fuels are available and at what price for both petrol & desiel where you intend to launch/fish from.
 

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Outboards have got massively more reliable over the past 15 years or so and even really new tech outboards have now been around for the best part of 10 years with computer controlled ignition and fueling systems, limp home modes in case of problems etc.

They have also got massively better in terms of fuel consumption just like petrol powered cars have, but a marine diesel still offers cost advantages in terms of fuel, but depends greatly on whether you have access to marina side fuel or not - if you have to fill from a roadside service station, the cost advantage is not so great.

You also have to look at the overall costs - if you're going to pay someone to do your servicing, especially on a diesel inboard that drives through a leg, the servicing costs are likely to massively outweigh the servicing costs of an outboard. Worth noting though that many outboards to have a full service require a tech with a laptop, so at least part of the servicing is getting taken out of the hands of a home mechanic.

There is one brand of modern outboard that only requires a dealer service once every three years.

One other thing to bear in mind if you're intending to trailer the boat is the significant extra weight of a diesel over an outboard, and if shaft driven, the outboard will have quite a bit of additional draft which will complicate launching and recovery.

I would agree with others who've already said that there is no definitive answer, and although there has been a massive shift to large outboards on larger boats, a diesel inboard wil no doubt still suit some people's situations better.
 

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How many hours do you think you might possibly be on the water each year, if you only fish at weekends and have a boat that is very weather dependant you may find you dont get to do that many hours. To power a 6m boat with a diesel engine will cost a considerable amount more in the initial price of the engine which you would have to look at how long it would take to make any savings in terms of fuel. Boat handling can often be improved by having the weight of a diesel sitting low in the hull. Since my move to the modern 4 strokes Ive never had to put up with smoke or fumes that even the modern 2 strokes still have (to a less extent) which makes a huge difference to boating with my family. If the smell of diesel or two stroke oil is all part of a day on the water as a few of my mates say they now miss then consider them.

With my suzuki 90 I can travel roughly 100k on 30lt of fuel with a rig about 1.5 tons loaded up. http://suzukimarine.com.au/assets/Uploads/DF90A-Signature-502RF.pdf this isnt as good as I was getting from my Yam 4 stroke on my last boat but very close.
JonD
 

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Ive never had to put up with smoke or fumes that even the modern 2 strokes still have (to a less extent)
Which modern two strokes are you talking about? I've had an Etec and now an Optimax (two of only the three types you can still buy) - you might see the occasional whiff of smoke at idle but there's definitely no smell or anything you could remotely call fumes.
 

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Rather than get into any outboard battle I have pm my findings.

How popular are the optimax back there, they seem to the flavour of the month with government body's recently. I dive with a mate with a 300 verado, its like a rocket boat and our marine rescue has twin 250 verado's but are about to change them due to running costs.
JonD
 
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