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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

picked up a couple of these today, as I was intrigued by them, as you do…

From what I managed to find out Purglas is South African company, apparently they have quite a reputation there, have been in some casting competitions etc.
These are 400/0 & 400/1 Executive, Graphite / Carbon, around 14Ft. Apparently lighter end of the range, but seem pretty solid to me. Well considering what they are catching in RSA lighter is relative I guess.
Look better then I expected, all Fuji guides and real seat etc.

Anyone knows something more about them? Are they any good? What are they worth?

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bronzehai will be your man for info on these I suspect? Very short looking handles for 14ft beachcasters?
Thanks, let’s see if he or others have more experience with these.
They are strange things, very thick at the butt and then pretty much continuous taper to the top.
Yes, pretty short handle, around 45cm to the bottom of the reel seat, but very nice thick foam all over. Just checked, bit less than 14ft, closer to 13.5ft…
 

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First balnk manufacturer in South Africa to use carbon in their rods, and then took the market by storm and even Blue Marlin that followed with a near identical product never really made inroads into the market. Purglas were on a winner, and never developed it further. The Blue Marlin introduced a range of blanks with a stronger carbon allowing more power but infinitely lighter and Purglas never really recovered, as they thought their wonderfully heavy and robust design would prevail - it didn't. They then went through a phase for a couple of years of spreading their products around the world, thinking they were world beaters, and the US and UK were a couple of those markets, and the bombed. Eventually the original owner sold out and the new owners tried to develop the product but too much time had passed and by that time Blue Marlin were the premier builder of blanks and rods in the region.

I went to a trade tackle show and they were showing off their development blanks and rods, and the salesman's pitch was that they were so strong, you could drive over them with a 4x4 pick up - i wasn't impressed, as they couldn't give straight answers to technical questions without BS, that range never did take off.

The design has basically stayed the same since the first days, 30+ years ago, heavy glass skrim with T24 carbon over the top, to make a very thick walled blank, that is seriously heavy. The changed the composition of wraps of carbon according to the strength desired. The start off with the /0, /1, all the way up the range to /5. The two that you have are the 400/0 and 400/1, which are basically a 2-3oz and 3-4oz designs. The 400 element of the code is the core blank length without the glued in spigot, which then makes the rod 4.20 meters, or just under 14'. The general designs were one piece, of which these blanks are the same, with out any reinforcing at the cut points where the glued in spigots are mounted to make them 3 piece. The general fishing style down here at the time, was all multipliers and low reel position, but they also made a few that were for fixed spool spinning, with a compromise butt, which these are a fine example - the 40 first guide is the give away. You can actually still get the exact same design from the new company, as they are in part still popular with some old timers, but they are seriously heavy when compared to anything modern, because of their very dated design. We used to do a lot of refurbishments to these rods, as the clear coat glaze on the blank is very prone to cracking and ungluing in sunlight. We could take a standard build and shed about 2-300 grams off the build, from the original near 1.2kg weight. They are now popular conversion blanks for fixed spool and braid, the softer carbons make them quite forgiving and effective; especially in the /2 and /3 ranges, as they equate more to powerful 5 or 6oz rods respectively, but still quite heavy.

Cheers from sunny Africa
 

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First balnk manufacturer in South Africa to use carbon in their rods, and then took the market by storm and even Blue Marlin that followed with a near identical product never really made inroads into the market. Purglas were on a winner, and never developed it further. The Blue Marlin introduced a range of blanks with a stronger carbon allowing more power but infinitely lighter and Purglas never really recovered, as they thought their wonderfully heavy and robust design would prevail - it didn't. They then went through a phase for a couple of years of spreading their products around the world, thinking they were world beaters, and the US and UK were a couple of those markets, and the bombed. Eventually the original owner sold out and the new owners tried to develop the product but too much time had passed and by that time Blue Marlin were the premier builder of blanks and rods in the region.

I went to a trade tackle show and they were showing off their development blanks and rods, and the salesman's pitch was that they were so strong, you could drive over them with a 4x4 pick up - i wasn't impressed, as they couldn't give straight answers to technical questions without BS, that range never did take off.

The design has basically stayed the same since the first days, 30+ years ago, heavy glass skrim with T24 carbon over the top, to make a very thick walled blank, that is seriously heavy. The changed the composition of wraps of carbon according to the strength desired. The start off with the /0, /1, all the way up the range to /5. The two that you have are the 400/0 and 400/1, which are basically a 2-3oz and 3-4oz designs. The 400 element of the code is the core blank length without the glued in spigot, which then makes the rod 4.20 meters, or just under 14'. The general designs were one piece, of which these blanks are the same, with out any reinforcing at the cut points where the glued in spigots are mounted to make them 3 piece. The general fishing style down here at the time, was all multipliers and low reel position, but they also made a few that were for fixed spool spinning, with a compromise butt, which these are a fine example - the 40 first guide is the give away. You can actually still get the exact same design from the new company, as they are in part still popular with some old timers, but they are seriously heavy when compared to anything modern, because of their very dated design. We used to do a lot of refurbishments to these rods, as the clear coat glaze on the blank is very prone to cracking and ungluing in sunlight. We could take a standard build and shed about 2-300 grams off the build, from the original near 1.2kg weight. They are now popular conversion blanks for fixed spool and braid, the softer carbons make them quite forgiving and effective; especially in the /2 and /3 ranges, as they equate more to powerful 5 or 6oz rods respectively, but still quite heavy.

Cheers from sunny Africa
You'll have @JonD along soon Spouting is usual Nonsense and Drivel with only need spin gear! No wonder they Exported the Tw'at to a Penal Colony!
 

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You'll have @JonD along soon Spouting is usual Nonsense and Drivel with only need spin gear! No wonder they Exported the Tw'at to a Penal Colony!
Some people live such boring little lives, all they can ever do is envy those who go out and do the things some others dream of!!!!!!......can you please stop following and tagging me, you're not my type.
 

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Funky! Those handles remind me of cheapo spinning rods. Only ever used a buttpad for skate and big conger from the shore in the UK and yes it's reel down for me!
 

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Funky! Those handles remind me of cheapo spinning rods. Only ever used a buttpad for skate and big conger from the shore in the UK and yes it's reel down for me!
Butt pads become a serious precaution for surf fishing, when even casting out a small fish bait you are likely to get hooked up with anything from 5ks to 100kgs.
 

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I brought a light one piece Purglass rod home from SA in 1980. I loved it. I used it for beach fishing in Durban for stumpies and carp fishing in the Vaal dam. It was 11-12 foot hollow glass and had a wood/twine butt.
Luxair accepted that and another one piece 14 foot rod as cabin luggage and they were placed along the windows in the cabin. We transferred in Luxembourg without them and unsurprisingly they took around a week to arrive at my address.
I eventually had to cut both in half and lost them when they were stored with family when we moved to Italy.
I still have my leather butt pad from Durban and use it with reel down rods that I have.
 

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Makes sense to me.
Just had a client in the shop, his diminutive wife (she probably only weighs 80lbs), was out with him on Saturday, and had a 22kg (48lbs) Kob - that took off for Angola, and then she spent 40 minutes fighting it back - with a butt pad! Reel down, fixed spool with 25lb braid. Not something she was aiming for, but she was certainly pleased that she had worn one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
First balnk manufacturer in South Africa to use carbon in their rods, and then took the market by storm and even Blue Marlin that followed with a near identical product never really made inroads into the market. Purglas were on a winner, and never developed it further. The Blue Marlin introduced a range of blanks with a stronger carbon allowing more power but infinitely lighter and Purglas never really recovered, as they thought their wonderfully heavy and robust design would prevail - it didn't. They then went through a phase for a couple of years of spreading their products around the world, thinking they were world beaters, and the US and UK were a couple of those markets, and the bombed. Eventually the original owner sold out and the new owners tried to develop the product but too much time had passed and by that time Blue Marlin were the premier builder of blanks and rods in the region.

I went to a trade tackle show and they were showing off their development blanks and rods, and the salesman's pitch was that they were so strong, you could drive over them with a 4x4 pick up - i wasn't impressed, as they couldn't give straight answers to technical questions without BS, that range never did take off.

The design has basically stayed the same since the first days, 30+ years ago, heavy glass skrim with T24 carbon over the top, to make a very thick walled blank, that is seriously heavy. The changed the composition of wraps of carbon according to the strength desired. The start off with the /0, /1, all the way up the range to /5. The two that you have are the 400/0 and 400/1, which are basically a 2-3oz and 3-4oz designs. The 400 element of the code is the core blank length without the glued in spigot, which then makes the rod 4.20 meters, or just under 14'. The general designs were one piece, of which these blanks are the same, with out any reinforcing at the cut points where the glued in spigots are mounted to make them 3 piece. The general fishing style down here at the time, was all multipliers and low reel position, but they also made a few that were for fixed spool spinning, with a compromise butt, which these are a fine example - the 40 first guide is the give away. You can actually still get the exact same design from the new company, as they are in part still popular with some old timers, but they are seriously heavy when compared to anything modern, because of their very dated design. We used to do a lot of refurbishments to these rods, as the clear coat glaze on the blank is very prone to cracking and ungluing in sunlight. We could take a standard build and shed about 2-300 grams off the build, from the original near 1.2kg weight. They are now popular conversion blanks for fixed spool and braid, the softer carbons make them quite forgiving and effective; especially in the /2 and /3 ranges, as they equate more to powerful 5 or 6oz rods respectively, but still quite heavy.

Cheers from sunny Africa
Thanks, that’s amazing level of detail.
I managed to find just 20-30% of that with Google.
‘Luckily’ we don’t need to worry about any sunlight damage in UK, perhaps that’s why they are in good nick.
I just put mine on kitchen scale - 400/1 is 602g and 400/0 560g.
So similar to my other beachcasters, but I guess for lighter leads. 3-4Oz should fit to estuary, clean ground, nice weather work, which will work for me. Not sure how casting works with these handles, but will find out.
They feel nice, and I like those unusual, quirky items. Worth a little experiment for sure…
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Just had a client in the shop, his diminutive wife (she probably only weighs 80lbs), was out with him on Saturday, and had a 22kg (48lbs) Kob - that took off for Angola, and then she spent 40 minutes fighting it back - with a butt pad! Reel down, fixed spool with 25lb braid. Not something she was aiming for, but she was certainly pleased that she had worn one.
This explains why they came with a couple of nice looking pads as well. Shorter handle would certainly work better with these. Not sure in UK you can accidentally catch such beasts very often. Can’t see myself wearing one on our beaches, would probably jinx unlikely opportunity of needing one.

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This explains why they came with a couple of nice looking pads as well. Shorter handle would certainly work better with these. Not sure in UK you can accidentally catch such beasts very often. Can’t see myself wearing one on our beaches, would probably jinx unlikely opportunity of needing one.

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They are brand new, we used to sell similar ones in the shop, and my wife has been using one with a wider support for years - to help with her occasionally weak back.

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We have exactly that model for our guiding rods, clients love them, especially at the end of a day of hard fishing. We see kids from a very early age starting their surf fishing with belts, and the excess straps are so long, it is dragging on the ground behind them, they are an essential, and surprisingly comfortable with all rods used reel down.

The tendency down here is to use just one rod at a time, and hold it while standing waiting for bites; though sand spikes are becoming popular, and tubes pushed into the sand called 'pensioner pipes'.

Back slightly to the diminutive lady, she and her husband have a gentle competition with their fishing, and for a long while she held their personal record for biggest Kob at 19.4kgs, until in October past he managed one of 21kgs, and felt very boosted by that new status. He is now busy making plans to exceed her 22kg Kob - nothing accidental about their fishing, just competitive nature.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yup, that’s the same one. Seems very comfortable and well made to my untrained eye.
Certainly essential kit in your part of the world, I meant it would be accidental to need it on UK beaches, on boat probably more likely. Those ladies certainly know what they are doing, respect.

Btw. got a spike and one of those ‘pensioner pipes’ as a part of the lot, it’s a whole setup for beach and spinning. I love the concept, one rod and spike / tube and you’re fishing, again many beaches with shingle will not take them, but sandy ones will and I’ll give them a try.

Also, must post some of the rigs I found there in appropriate section, once I manage to get a closer look. A lot of cork in those rigs? Keeping bait of the ground for pelagic species?
 

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Yup, that’s the same one. Seems very comfortable and well made to my untrained eye.
Certainly essential kit in your part of the world, I meant it would be accidental to need it on UK beaches, on boat probably more likely. Those ladies certainly know what they are doing, respect.

Btw. got a spike and one of those ‘pensioner pipes’ as a part of the lot, it’s a whole setup for beach and spinning. I love the concept, one rod and spike / tube and you’re fishing, again many beaches with shingle will not take them, but sandy ones will and I’ll give them a try.

Also, must post some of the rigs I found there in appropriate section, once I manage to get a closer look. A lot of cork in those rigs? Keeping bait of the ground for pelagic species?
Spikes work ok on fine to medium shingle but no good on the cricket ball sized stuff.
You normally find a flat rock or driftwood to spread the load a bit more at the surface in pea shingle.
On rock marks you can usually find a crevice or wedge to hold the spike steady.
 

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Also, must post some of the rigs I found there in appropriate section, once I manage to get a closer look. A lot of cork in those rigs? Keeping bait of the ground for pelagic species?
The small buoyant rigs are mostly used for bottom species that will feed just off the bottom, as well as the odd pelagic, like Bluefish. Buoyant baits in the UK would probably work for Bass, Cod, Tope, Hounds and the like, even Whiting.
 
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