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From another thread on here - 13' Tip Tornado Ultralite ST 630grams total (51 more than a 'normal' Ultralite, but it has a fuji seat rather than breakaway coasters).
 

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I keep getting this impression that we are overdoing the size / weight of tackle for beach fishing in the UK. These rods are on average 700-900g, reels are not much lighter especially fixed spool - 7/8000, 14000... Add the line, weights, baits we are holding 4-5 Lb of gear chasing fish which is, if we are lucky, 4-5 Lb, rarely 10+.
My lure setup rod and reel are less then 1Lb and can easily manage 5Lb fish, will probably do OK with 10Lb as well.

I'm trying to go a bit lighter, around 550g rod and 6000 reel, still feels pretty hefty. I don't need 500m of line and with strong rod / reel / line most of fish around our beaches don't stand much of a chance... I know snags are there and casting is biggest stress for rod, but holding 3 rather than 5 Lb, also has some casting benefits. Of course, I'm quite new in this and pendulum casting is beyond my skills and ambitions.
 

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I keep getting this impression that we are overdoing the size / weight of tackle for beach fishing in the UK. These rods are on average 700-900g, reels are not much lighter especially fixed spool - 7/8000, 14000... Add the line, weights, baits we are holding 4-5 Lb of gear chasing fish which is, if we are lucky, 4-5 Lb, rarely 10+.
My lure setup rod and reel are less then 1Lb and can easily manage 5Lb fish, will probably do OK with 10Lb as well.

I'm trying to go a bit lighter, around 550g rod and 6000 reel, still feels pretty hefty. I don't need 500m of line and with strong rod / reel / line most of fish around our beaches don't stand much of a chance... I know snags are there and casting is biggest stress for rod, but holding 3 rather than 5 Lb, also has some casting benefits. Of course, I'm quite new in this and pendulum casting is beyond my skills and ambitions.
In part you are perhaps correct, and on the flip side less so. It is not just the species that you might be targeting, but also the prevailing conditions where they are found, especially tide and current, as well as rough and heavy ground. Also other factors like summer time weed, which can build up on lines, to the point where a very heavy load needs to be winched in. Given these parameters, then strong rods become an essential element, and strength in longer beachcasting rods is achieved through wall thickness of the carbon composites - weight.

On the flip side, we have been experimenting in part with this down here since the near universal adoption of braids, found that because of the tide/current cutting qualities of the material, we can get away with substantially less sinker weight, but still maintain anchorage on the bottom. So, we have introduced a series of much lighter rods in the 12-13' range capable of casting less sinker and bait weight, but still having capabilities of necessary distance and capable of handling most of the fish we catch. My wife's new favourite rod is a 13', 4oz beast which is paired with a 4000 reel and the whole package is quite light, yet she has landed Stingrays up to 14.5kgs and many other species over the 10kg mark. However, as soon as the conditions dictate - rough swell and weed and strong cross current, she picks up her much more robust 5-6oz 14' set up.

So, a lot depends on where and how, as well as a desire to go light.
 

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In part you are perhaps correct, and on the flip side less so. It is not just the species that you might be targeting, but also the prevailing conditions where they are found, especially tide and current, as well as rough and heavy ground. Also other factors like summer time weed, which can build up on lines, to the point where a very heavy load needs to be winched in. Given these parameters, then strong rods become an essential element, and strength in longer beachcasting rods is achieved through wall thickness of the carbon composites - weight.

On the flip side, we have been experimenting in part with this down here since the near universal adoption of braids, found that because of the tide/current cutting qualities of the material, we can get away with substantially less sinker weight, but still maintain anchorage on the bottom. So, we have introduced a series of much lighter rods in the 12-13' range capable of casting less sinker and bait weight, but still having capabilities of necessary distance and capable of handling most of the fish we catch. My wife's new favourite rod is a 13', 4oz beast which is paired with a 4000 reel and the whole package is quite light, yet she has landed Stingrays up to 14.5kgs and many other species over the 10kg mark. However, as soon as the conditions dictate - rough swell and weed and strong cross current, she picks up her much more robust 5-6oz 14' set up.

So, a lot depends on where and how, as well as a desire to go light.
Thanks, that makes sense. I know there are a lot of years of experience behind this tackle. Still very new to this and trying to understand the right way to do it.
Was fishing over the weekend and tip of my light, not expensive rod broke after a couple of casts with 4Oz. Serves me right, lesson learned.
 

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Thanks, that makes sense. I know there are a lot of years of experience behind this tackle. Still very new to this and trying to understand the right way to do it.
Was fishing over the weekend and tip of my light, not expensive rod broke after a couple of casts with 4Oz. Serves me right, lesson learned.
Casting a 4oz sinker generates a lot of load through the cast - upwards of 30lbs+. The strengths of rods are crudely measured through a concept of 'test curves', where perhaps a 12'carp blank might pull round to 90 degrees of bend at 2-3lbs, offering a capability of casting a 2 or 2.5oz weight to reasonable distance. While some 14' beach casting blanks need upwards of 35lbs to pull them round to 90 degrees, and are capable of casting just 5 or 6oz sinkers over 260 metres on a tournament field. The strength within the design and build of the blank is through the correct placement of many layers of carbon, all adding considerably to the weight, but ultimately the supreme strength desired.

There is obviously a considerable middle ground in that equation, which serves most mortals on the beach. Also market forces define that most blanks or rods for the UK market be able to cast in the pendulum style, even if they are never going to be cast in that manner, so need additional layers/strength to cope with that style. Also, a lot of weight can be shed by the components used on the rods, a simple 24" EVA handle will weigh over 150 grams, shrink tube much less.
 
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