World Sea Fishing Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Opinions on this fish. I caught a few earlier when out mackerel fishing but I wasn't sure what they were. A guy fishing said they were bass schoolies but I didn't think they looked anything like bass. I thought they might be very young whiting or something. Wasn't sure if they were edible or legal size so threw them back. Identified them when I got home and realised they were horse mackerel. Kind of annoyed as would like to have tried them for dinner.

What's your opinion on horse mackerel for eating? Worth keeping or not? I love Mackerel but guessing these taste quite different.

Kind of tempted to go out again early tomorrow morning to try and catch some more.
 
I

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Never tried em.
Always been told fish eat em we don't lol. Think they are meant to be bony.
But as far as i know there is no reason not to eat them.
If you love fish give them a go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,509 Posts
Scad are good eating .

I have served Scad dippers* to a friend who was of the opinion they were "too bony, inedible" and he was suprised how good they were !

Flavour wise they are mild mackerel.

* fillet as mackerel , skin and cut out centre of fillet bones . Tempura batter or seasoned flour and fry!
 
I

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Scad are good eating .

I have served Scad dippers* to a friend who was of the opinion they were "too bony, inedible" and he was suprised how good they were !

Flavour wise they are mild mackerel.

* fillet as mackerel , skin and cut out centre of fillet bones . Tempura batter or seasoned flour and fry!
same to be said for wrasse i've heard? (not tried)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks all.

I love Mackerel so a mild tasting mackerel is fine by me. Wish I kept a couple. Live and learn. Tried again this morning but nothing biting. Pretty blustery out compared to last night. Will try again later for an hour.

Tried wrasse once. Was horrible and mushy. A commercial fisherman told me they are better at certain times of year as they firm up. I think this is true of lots of fish. Can easily be put off by one bad experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
They are quite bony, but the orientals hold them in very high regard, especially for Sashimi/Sushi...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
So much misinformation here.

It actually highlights to me again the difference between France, Spain, Italy etc. versus British on knowledge of fish and their eating qualities.

Horse Mackerel or Scad is a wonderful eating fish. The name is a little misleading in that it is not a mackerel type, in fact it is not even the same family. This idea that it is more bony than other fish is pure myth. It does require a little more preparation than a normal mackerel. I have found sturdy kitchen scissors work best to remove the very sharp fins and you have to cut the spikey ridge off the sides of the fish, starting from the tail. It might look and seem fussy, but it is not. It also has some scales which has to be removed with a de-scaler.

It can be fried whole in a pan with some olive oil with a few cherry tomatoes, garlic and even some capers, or the same in the oven.
As always keep the head on. I feel very strong about this: when cooking a fish whole, the head must always stay on. I don't get people who remove the head of a fish. I feel it is insulting to the fish to present it decapitated. It must be presented in a noble way: the way it lived. (Yes, I know, I am strange).

The other day I caught two decent sized garfish and had them on the barbecue. Absolutely fantastic. Again, the standard question on the beach was: "Can you eat it?"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,182 Posts
So much misinformation here.

It actually highlights to me again the difference between France, Spain, Italy etc. versus British on knowledge of fish and their eating qualities.
Ah the smug smell of Gallic cultural superiority, it hits you like the tang of garlic. As though all Frenchmen were akin to Michel Roux!

My take on the scad family - and I've eaten a number of species both in Portugal and when living in South East Asia - is that (as with most fresh fish) they are a perfectly fine eating fish, but there are plenty of other fish I'd pick ahead of them if I had the choice. Most of those who buy scad in the South East Asia region are those for whom grouper, snapper, Spanish mackerel etc are a bit dear. Pan fried in a very hot wok, or on the grill would be my preference. I'd sprinkle the sides with some salt and season with a dash of lemon/lime after cooking. They are bony, but not all that much more so than mackerel. They are also a very good, hardy livebait, so if you're seeing a lot of small ones, put one out on a big hook - you might bring back something bigger and better on the table.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
I agree with you Patudo, but remember the waters around the UK is actually fairly poor in variety of fish, so we have to do the best we can with what we have.

As to the Gallic cultural superiority I cannot comment on, except that I can vouch that the average cook (or restaurant) from France (or Italy or Spain) is in general way better than those from here in the UK. I am not sure as to why that is. London is of course an outlier, with some of the finest restaurants in the world, while Paris has some of the worst. But we are talking here about the average. The foodie revolution here in the UK is a fairly new phenomenon, maybe 15 years or so. Before that it was even worse, and outside London there is still quite a lag. Television and celebrity chefs played a big role, I guess, but whether young people will continue the trend is another question.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,523 Posts
Nice blog, Salar! Your first paragraph pretty much sums up what I have been going on and on and on and on about on this forum.
Thank you! We just have to encourage people to try, many good recipes are very simple and can be applied to the "non-fishmonger" species. Part of the problem is that many of us were brought up by mothers who were not interested in cooking or had jobs so they didn't have time, or as in my case brought up during WW2 when there were limited options anyway. TV cookery and the internet are making a big difference to food awareness but there is still a long way to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Thank you!
I just read something on your blog that really, really hit me. The bit about tying mackerel feathers on thinner line (or maybe even flouro-carbon) might just give one the edge in certain circumstances. I have always felt uncomfortable with the crude, thick line these things are sold with. What a great piece of advice. Thumbs up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,523 Posts
I just read something on your blog that really, really hit me. The bit about tying mackerel feathers on thinner line (or maybe even flouro-carbon) might just give one the edge in certain circumstances. I have always felt uncomfortable with the crude, thick line these things are sold with. What a great piece of advice. Thumbs up.
Don't go too thin because two mackerel going in opposite directions will snap 10lb mono - there isn't enough stretch in a short length to cushion the shock. 20lb is plenty strong enough for a stringful and still thin enough to give you the edge over those crude shop feathers. If you are going to tie your own try making a set with small hooks, they will work well early season when fry are small. Sorry to drift off topic but you can catch scad too!
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top