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Discussion Starter #1
Decided to finish work early today and spend the afternoon afloat in Poole Harbour. I have not boat fished in the harbour for several years and even then never really did enough to get to really get to know it so it was always going to be a bit of an exploration.

To avoid any suspense I blanked - if you want any more details go to the last para. However, the point of this post is to warn against what must be a hazard to small boats.

There was I mid afternoon tied to a buoy in Wych channel, just north of Brownsea island when I heard a ship's horn - it was the Brittany ferry announcing her departure and I watched her cast off and make her way slowly down the harbour making little disturbance to the calm surface of the harbour. After a while I lost interest and looked back at the rods but was shortly distracted by a sound of breaking water. Looking back towards where the ferry had passed some minutes earlier I was initially surprised but increasingly alarmed to see her wash buliding into a series of large breaking waves heading towards me, beam on. They must have reached 5 or 6 feet and for a moment I was quite alarmed. I considered starting the engine & letting go of the mooring but decided against it as time was short instead I closed the front hatch, checked my lifejacket and hung on tight. Well, by the time the wash reached me it has subsided to about 3-4 feet having reached deeper water again but still foaming on top and the boat took it ok, about 45 degrees on the bow, having been naturally swung into it. What must have happened is that the wash had piled up as it left the ship channel (circa 25ft deep) and crossed the mud bank (circa 2ft) separting the channel where where I was fishing. It's like a mini Tsunami effect though of course much less dramtic or destructive. However, I felt it could have been dangerous in several ways:
First if my boat was smaller or less seaworthy;
Second if I had not heard/seen it coming (e.g. if it had not been flat calm and there had been a surface chop making more noise) and had perhaps been standing up;
Third if I had been more or less stern on and...
Fourth if I had been mored or drifting at the shallow northern edge of the channel instead of in the deeper part (c.20ft) further south.

Otherwise a gorgeous afternoon untroubled by anything fish-like. I used rag and slipper limpet with squid tips on a variety of attractor spoon and bead rigs both ledgered and under a float. Also had a bag of mashed bread over the side to see if any mullet apperaed but did not see any. On a brighter note the terns are nesting on Brownsea and dive bombing in the water so there must be some fry or sandeels about.

Cheers
Boy Scott
 

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Were you tied to a navigation bouy or a yacht mooring? The Yacht moorings are all for fin or bilge keel yachts and are in areas that do not dry at LW. From what you say I can guess where you were. The large area of sand bar that the waves form up on is probably only 12 " deep at full low water (You do know about the double tides?). What happens is displacement and replacement rather than wash. The displacement of the ferry pushes a huge ammount of water out and forward of the ship it is this that causes the waves, and the corresponding back surge as it goes back. In the summer the PWC's wait for the big humps of water to leap high in the air. A part of the shallow water is specifically for PWC's

Moveing on if you want more information and tips about fishing Poole have a look at this site.........

http://www.pbsbac.co.uk/

The best boat fishing site in the South of England. To join the web site is free to join the club cost's pennies.
We have some very funny (in every way) members and the forum is better than TV. There's some there that actualy catch fish too!!!

Afishionado
 

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Decided to finish work early today and spend the afternoon afloat in Poole Harbour. I have not boat fished in the harbour for several years and even then never really did enough to get to really get to know it so it was always going to be a bit of an exploration.

To avoid any suspense I blanked - if you want any more details go to the last para. However, the point of this post is to warn against what must be a hazard to small boats.

There was I mid afternoon tied to a buoy in Wych channel, just north of Brownsea island when I heard a ship's horn - it was the Brittany ferry announcing her departure and I watched her cast off and make her way slowly down the harbour making little disturbance to the calm surface of the harbour. After a while I lost interest and looked back at the rods but was shortly distracted by a sound of breaking water. Looking back towards where the ferry had passed some minutes earlier I was initially surprised but increasingly alarmed to see her wash buliding into a series of large breaking waves heading towards me, beam on. They must have reached 5 or 6 feet and for a moment I was quite alarmed. I considered starting the engine & letting go of the mooring but decided against it as time was short instead I closed the front hatch, checked my lifejacket and hung on tight. Well, by the time the wash reached me it has subsided to about 3-4 feet having reached deeper water again but still foaming on top and the boat took it ok, about 45 degrees on the bow, having been naturally swung into it. What must have happened is that the wash had piled up as it left the ship channel (circa 25ft deep) and crossed the mud bank (circa 2ft) separting the channel where where I was fishing. It's like a mini Tsunami effect though of course much less dramtic or destructive. However, I felt it could have been dangerous in several ways:
First if my boat was smaller or less seaworthy;
Second if I had not heard/seen it coming (e.g. if it had not been flat calm and there had been a surface chop making more noise) and had perhaps been standing up;
Third if I had been more or less stern on and...
Fourth if I had been mored or drifting at the shallow northern edge of the channel instead of in the deeper part (c.20ft) further south.

Otherwise a gorgeous afternoon untroubled by anything fish-like. I used rag and slipper limpet with squid tips on a variety of attractor spoon and bead rigs both ledgered and under a float. Also had a bag of mashed bread over the side to see if any mullet apperaed but did not see any. On a brighter note the terns are nesting on Brownsea and dive bombing in the water so there must be some fry or sandeels about.

Cheers
Boy Scott
I've seen that wash knock Grockles over like skittles on Baiter shore. Very nasty.
 

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I've seen that wash knock Grockles over like skittles on Baiter shore. Very nasty.

And didn't you laugh you little rascle you. Go on admit it.

Afishionado
 

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I've seen that wash knock Grockles over like skittles on Baiter shore. Very nasty.
I saw it smash the keel through the hull on a boat as it hit the bottom many years back. The pilot is an inconsiderate arrogant a****** and should be prosecuted.


Funny when he gets the grockles though :D
 
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If you just watch the waterline you can always tell when the Barfleur is heading out as the water gets sucked out and then surges back in.

Describing it like a mini Tsunami is pretty good.

As Afishionado said. Get more involved with PBSBAC max. You really won't regret it.

We've had some big shoals of mullet in Salterns already. IT is the slightly smaller, early season ones, but the big ones will follow shortly.

Went for a walk two nights ago and round in the North East corner (by Sandbanks Hotel) was the most enormous shoal of thin lips giong as far as the eye could see (well to the couple of angling boats anchored 1/4 mile off).
It was a very impressive sight watching the fish finning the surface and occasionally half heartedly broaching. It was half tide and for several hundred yards there was little more than a few inches of water. With the sunsetting behind them you could have been watching bonefish on some tropical flats.
Wonderful!

Tom
 
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....just imagin gazing out at the sun setting over the palm fringed beaches of Brownsea Island as the Big Game boats (some old single cylinder stink pot) head back to the quay.
As you gaze across the mirror calm twinkling water the fins are breaking the surface way into the distance towards an inventive angler kite fishing way out over the flats (Kite surfing across the mud).

...it was just like that, honest!

Tom
 

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I saw it smash the keel through the hull on a boat as it hit the bottom many years back. The pilot is an inconsiderate arrogant a****** and should be prosecuted.


Funny when he gets the grockles though :D
I have to agree with the remark about the Pilot Boat.
A couple of years ago with the roro ferry coming in through a very crowded Haven I saw a RIB right in the center of the channel but stationary with the two guys in it hanging over the back by the O/B. The Pilot Boat was blasting its horn but doing nothing but stick to the center of the channel about 300 yards away with the ferry about 500 yards behind him.
It was obvious that the RIB had a problem and could not move. I had to flash in to the RIB give them a rope and told them to hang on. As I towed the RIB out of the fairway the Pilot Boat came along side and a puce coloured banker let go a stream of invective that could have peeled paint. The fact that the poor bloody RIB was without power totaly escaped him.
After the danger was over it turned out that the RIB's bow rope had slipped over the side and as it was longer than the boat it had been caught up by the prop'.

Lesson to learn? Never have a fixed bow rope longer than the craft it is on.

Afishionado
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Were you tied to a navigation bouy or a yacht mooring? <snip> What happens is displacement and replacement rather than wash.
Afishionado
Yes it was a mooring rather than a nav mark, directly off where the East end beach on the N shore of Brownsea meets the lagoon.

And I take the point about the displacement and replacement rather than wash, thanks.

Interesting comments about the pilot though - I'll keep a look out

Cheers all
 

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I wonder if he is the one that used to pilot the "Seamark" out of Swansea? his favourite trick was to go as close as possible to either side of the dredged channel, so that he created as much wash as possible for small craft anchored outside the channel.:nonono:
I saw one boat send a small personal flare across his bridge one day, bet that puckered his sphincter!:yeah:
blueskip
 

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When you think that even bigger ferries are coming to Poole due to the winter dredging, surely it just a matter of time before something messy happens?
 

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Hopefully the bigger ones will have to go slower to navigate safely!
 

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Hopefully the bigger ones will have to go slower to navigate safely!

Many will not believe this (but am I bovvered?) but here goes. A 15ft displacement dinghy at 5kts will have exactly the same bow wash hight as a 250 ft displacement ship. Therefore it is not the speed of the ferries, it is their displacement causing a suction and surge affect over any nearby shallow water.

Where as the Poole Pilot boat seems to be helmed by someone with a very small penis and too much testosterone, the ferry has behaved impeccably. Most near misses are caused by WAFI's or brash young bankers with power craft with more horsepower than they have brain cells. Oh and I must not leave out the bright pink Grockles in their £50 plastic inflateable bidet's who wave a bent length of ally tube with a tiny bit of broken white plastic paddle left on the end; as though by some mystic quality that only they posess it will stop a 20,000 ton fully laden lorry ferry dead in it's tracks.

Afishionado
 

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Many will not believe this (but am I bovvered?) but here goes. A 15ft displacement dinghy at 5kts will have exactly the same bow wash hight as a 250 ft displacement ship. Therefore it is not the speed of the ferries, it is their displacement causing a suction and surge affect over any nearby shallow water.
I agree-but in theory the slower it goes the less the suction/surge becomes.

Besides, maybe the pilot boat will slow down then too...
 

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Just a tiny correctionette and not wishing in any way to cross bait pumps ...

Quote....less the suction/surge becomes

The speed at which it travels reduces but the volume remains the same. It will seem to be less because there is more time for it to dissipate.

Afishionado
 

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:D picky git


Just a tiny correctionette and not wishing in any way to cross bait pumps ...

Quote....less the suction/surge becomes

The speed at which it travels reduces but the volume remains the same. It will seem to be less because there is more time for it to dissipate.

Afishionado
 
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