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There are probably a few reasons why I set up the Evocative Angling blog last year; I wanted to share my angling experiences on a broader scale and a blog shared through the internet is a great platform to achieve that. I think when I started writing about my catches years ago I enjoyed the fact that people who couldn't get out and fish themselves could read my blog and really feel captivated, like they were part of the trip too. People would tell me they would pour a cup of tea or coffee for their morning break at work and the narrative of the blog would take them away from their workplace and into another world of fishing and adventure. I soon realized not only did this give other anglers a lot of pleasure, but also how much us sea fishermen have in common. It seemed very much like deep down we are this prehistoric being with the necessity to hunt, survive outdoors and be at one with nature.


We have to ask ourselves some very basic questions: Why do we crave a fire outdoors and feel so contented staring into the flames while listening to the inferno crackle? Why do we feel such contentment and enter an almost trance like state while sheltering in a cave watching the rain hammering down? Why do we feel so wonderful and optimistic about life as we watch the sun rise as it warms our faces and the sky changes colour? Why do we derive such joy from being out in nature, seeing all life's creatures around us? Why do we gaze so intently at the stars like our ancestors did so full of wonder? My conclusion is that man hasn't changed much in 10 million years, there is still a primal necessity to do what we did at the beginning of our time on this earth. It's ingrained in us and to tell the truth I don't understand people who don't like fishing, it's like they are living life in black and white or without imagination, those poor souls.

My first memory of fishing was being on Boscombe Beach in Dorset watching my dad fishing for bass in some horrendous December weather. I marveled at this 18" biceped man with no neck, a track suit and some Nike Cortez trainers as he put ragworm on a hook, cast out and caught these mercurial silver fish. It was so atmospheric, the spray from the sea, the ferocious wind and rain that I couldn't help but daydream. A lot of 4 or 5 year olds would have been crying to go home at this point, to me it was the best thing in the world and I really couldn't fathom why mum didn't want to come with us. He'd share his mints with me and share a joke. All fathers and sons should share the magic that is fishing together.


Next I was out in Gibraltar on a cricket tour with him and he was catching bream using clam as bait off a rocky mark on the Mediterranean. My next memory was fishing off a pier in Madeira and catching tropical fish with him opposite the Canberra that was in dock.

We then began an annual pilgrimage to Herm Island in the Channel Islands for a week or ten days each year. There we camped and I watched him catch plaice, conger eels, wrasse, pollock, bass, bream, mackerel and garfish. My brother and I even had a few fish there too as little boys, dad was always retackling us up as we'd always snag in the rocks and ignore his advice.

One of the most enjoyable things was probably bait digging, we had a real sense of purpose grabbing the worms for dad as he toiled in the morning sun and he always made us feel we were integral to getting the worms. I remember him getting trapped on the tidal island of Putrinez with his friend Mike Battison for 6 hours, they was hell to pay with my mother when he got back to the campsite. He made his token apology pretending it was an act of nature that had meant they had fished all day, he winked at me when my mother wasn't looking and told me about all the fish he'd caught.

I then had this break from fishing which lasted from my mid teens until I was 27. I have no idea why I didn't fish, but I guess girls and other sports had something to do with it. I had this craving to go and fish my local beach one day, I had never fished it before and didn't know anybody else who fished locally, but I gave it a go. I had 7 fish on my first night and was addicted. My next session I went to target bass and had two bites touch ledgering and 2 sizeable bass, was there anything better? I began reading everything I could about angling and watching everyone who was regarded as a decent angler and trying to learn.

Whoever said it takes a lifetime to be a good fisherman was probably right, it's one of these most complicated sports, but regarded by the masses as a simple eccentric hobby. I gradually began to learn and improve. Years later I am still studying it and being educated by experience.

Taking photos seemed to come naturally to me, it made so much sense to take a camera fishing and capturing all of the light I was seeing at dusk and dawn. Through the night can sometimes be the most beautiful time, everything is so subtle and captures the imagination. Fishing is so good for the mind, I find I am so alive with thoughts and you notice things you probably wouldn't in the usual walks of life.



The obsession that is fishing took that hold on me and has never let go since. I began to look at my family history and this reaffirmed by belief that fishing was a very natural occupation. My great grandfather form Orkney had been a fisherman, it was how he made a living along with crofting, it fed the family and gave them long lives. He'd come back in his small boat rowing through the Scapa Flow when my father was a boy, the craft would be full to the gunnels with herring and other species, he'd often talk about killer whales and sharks being attracted to his catches while he fished the open sea. I looked into the family more and it appeared every generation of the Kennedy's had fished right back to 1490 where I found a crown charter decreeing the salmon rights to a son (John Kennedy, Constable of Aberdeenshire) from a deceased father(William Kennedy, Constable of Aberdeenshire) on his deathbed to a river in Aberdeenshire. It made me think, did I ever have a choice in fishing? Or is it just in my blood and DNA?



I hope you enjoy the blog guys.


http://evocativeangling.rocks/2016/02/11/sea-fishing-the-why/
Facebook: Evocative Angling
 

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Loved that.
Cracking picture, that third one. Others too, but that especially.
A problem is only serious if you think about it whilst fishing. As you say, good for the soul.
Cheers,
 
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i really hope people read and understand what you just wrote there kennedy. i can only remember one bait digging trip and one family fishing trip with my dad when i was a kid,he didn't really do the dad and lad thing.

we lived in iran when i was younger for a while, having to return to the uk due to the revolution . a few years later, by then living with my grandparents in fife i saw perch in one of the local park ponds and decided i was going to try and catch some. where that came from i have no idea, so like you i believe it is part of our dna.

busy modern life does not lend itself to interacting with nature . many people live in densely populated cities or towns and those that venture to the more remote parts of the country seem glad just to walk around and look at the scenery as it is such a massive difference from what they see daily . activities such as hunting and fishing are seen as the preserve of those of neanderthal persuasion by many and that worries me. it appears they actually need to have rules and regulations to live their lives by or they could not function.

the beauty of fishing for me, particularly sea angling ,is the ability to look at a spot on a map (more like google earth these days) and just go .no permit or licence to buy. no officials to inform. the only decisions to be made are how are you going fish, what are you targeting and what gear will you take.

invariably every trip will will have something to remember,some sight that was seen, that would have been missed by even the most avid scenery watcher, because without that interaction over years they do not realise they are looking without seeing what is really going on.
cheers rab
 

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Great pictures Chris and your writing skills are brilliant always able submerse myself when reading your write ups or reports. Your passion for fishing clearly portrays itself well done fella.
 
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View attachment 327642
There are probably a few reasons why I set up the Evocative Angling blog last year; I wanted to share my angling experiences on a broader scale and a blog shared through the internet is a great platform to achieve that. I think when I started writing about my catches years ago I enjoyed the fact that people who couldn't get out and fish themselves could read my blog and really feel captivated, like they were part of the trip too. People would tell me they would pour a cup of tea or coffee for their morning break at work and the narrative of the blog would take them away from their workplace and into another world of fishing and adventure. I soon realized not only did this give other anglers a lot of pleasure, but also how much us sea fishermen have in common. It seemed very much like deep down we are this prehistoric being with the necessity to hunt, survive outdoors and be at one with nature.


We have to ask ourselves some very basic questions: Why do we crave a fire outdoors and feel so contented staring into the flames while listening to the inferno crackle? Why do we feel such contentment and enter an almost trance like state while sheltering in a cave watching the rain hammering down? Why do we feel so wonderful and optimistic about life as we watch the sun rise as it warms our faces and the sky changes colour? Why do we derive such joy from being out in nature, seeing all life's creatures around us? Why do we gaze so intently at the stars like our ancestors did so full of wonder? My conclusion is that man hasn't changed much in 10 million years, there is still a primal necessity to do what we did at the beginning of our time on this earth. It's ingrained in us and to tell the truth I don't understand people who don't like fishing, it's like they are living life in black and white or without imagination, those poor souls.

My first memory of fishing was being on Boscombe Beach in Dorset watching my dad fishing for bass in some horrendous December weather. I marveled at this 18" biceped man with no neck, a track suit and some Nike Cortez trainers as he put ragworm on a hook, cast out and caught these mercurial silver fish. It was so atmospheric, the spray from the sea, the ferocious wind and rain that I couldn't help but daydream. A lot of 4 or 5 year olds would have been crying to go home at this point, to me it was the best thing in the world and I really couldn't fathom why mum didn't want to come with us. He'd share his mints with me and share a joke. All fathers and sons should share the magic that is fishing together.


Next I was out in Gibraltar on a cricket tour with him and he was catching bream using clam as bait off a rocky mark on the Mediterranean. My next memory was fishing off a pier in Madeira and catching tropical fish with him opposite the Canberra that was in dock.

We then began an annual pilgrimage to Herm Island in the Channel Islands for a week or ten days each year. There we camped and I watched him catch plaice, conger eels, wrasse, pollock, bass, bream, mackerel and garfish. My brother and I even had a few fish there too as little boys, dad was always retackling us up as we'd always snag in the rocks and ignore his advice.

One of the most enjoyable things was probably bait digging, we had a real sense of purpose grabbing the worms for dad as he toiled in the morning sun and he always made us feel we were integral to getting the worms. I remember him getting trapped on the tidal island of Putrinez with his friend Mike Battison for 6 hours, they was hell to pay with my mother when he got back to the campsite. He made his token apology pretending it was an act of nature that had meant they had fished all day, he winked at me when my mother wasn't looking and told me about all the fish he'd caught.

I then had this break from fishing which lasted from my mid teens until I was 27. I have no idea why I didn't fish, but I guess girls and other sports had something to do with it. I had this craving to go and fish my local beach one day, I had never fished it before and didn't know anybody else who fished locally, but I gave it a go. I had 7 fish on my first night and was addicted. My next session I went to target bass and had two bites touch ledgering and 2 sizeable bass, was there anything better? I began reading everything I could about angling and watching everyone who was regarded as a decent angler and trying to learn.

Whoever said it takes a lifetime to be a good fisherman was probably right, it's one of these most complicated sports, but regarded by the masses as a simple eccentric hobby. I gradually began to learn and improve. Years later I am still studying it and being educated by experience.

Taking photos seemed to come naturally to me, it made so much sense to take a camera fishing and capturing all of the light I was seeing at dusk and dawn. Through the night can sometimes be the most beautiful time, everything is so subtle and captures the imagination. Fishing is so good for the mind, I find I am so alive with thoughts and you notice things you probably wouldn't in the usual walks of life.



The obsession that is fishing took that hold on me and has never let go since. I began to look at my family history and this reaffirmed by belief that fishing was a very natural occupation. My great grandfather form Orkney had been a fisherman, it was how he made a living along with crofting, it fed the family and gave them long lives. He'd come back in his small boat rowing through the Scapa Flow when my father was a boy, the craft would be full to the gunnels with herring and other species, he'd often talk about killer whales and sharks being attracted to his catches while he fished the open sea. I looked into the family more and it appeared every generation of the Kennedy's had fished right back to 1490 where I found a crown charter decreeing the salmon rights to a son (John Kennedy, Constable of Aberdeenshire) from a deceased father(William Kennedy, Constable of Aberdeenshire) on his deathbed to a river in Aberdeenshire. It made me think, did I ever have a choice in fishing? Or is it just in my blood and DNA?



I hope you enjoy the blog guys.


http://evocativeangling.rocks/2016/02/11/sea-fishing-the-why/
Facebook: Evocative Angling

Good post, I know exactly where you're coming from. I follow your page on Facebook and like reading what you put there and the photos are brilliant. A mate of mine who likes walking a lot, knows where some of your marks are and we hope to fish some of them, fantastic part of our coast.
 
K

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Loved that.
Cracking picture, that third one. Others too, but that especially.
A problem is only serious if you think about it whilst fishing. As you say, good for the soul.
Cheers,
That's absolutely true...
Was that an old Chinese adage? I heard a great one on a documentary about China the other night, but can't remember it. Have you watched "A river runs through it?" I think the film encapsulates the way I feel about fishing.




i really hope people read and understand what you just wrote there kennedy. i can only remember one bait digging trip and one family fishing trip with my dad when i was a kid,he didn't really do the dad and lad thing.

we lived in iran when i was younger for a while, having to return to the uk due to the revolution . a few years later, by then living with my grandparents in fife i saw perch in one of the local park ponds and decided i was going to try and catch some. where that came from i have no idea, so like you i believe it is part of our dna.

busy modern life does not lend itself to interacting with nature . many people live in densely populated cities or towns and those that venture to the more remote parts of the country seem glad just to walk around and look at the scenery as it is such a massive difference from what they see daily . activities such as hunting and fishing are seen as the preserve of those of neanderthal persuasion by many and that worries me. it appears they actually need to have rules and regulations to live their lives by or they could not function.

the beauty of fishing for me, particularly sea angling ,is the ability to look at a spot on a map (more like google earth these days) and just go .no permit or licence to buy. no officials to inform. the only decisions to be made are how are you going fish, what are you targeting and what gear will you take.

invariably every trip will will have something to remember,some sight that was seen, that would have been missed by even the most avid scenery watcher, because without that interaction over years they do not realise they are looking without seeing what is really going on.
cheers rab
Sounds like you have had an interesting life Rab, particularly leaving Iran with the falling of the Shah. I just think I remember a fishing session years ago vividly, but if you asked me what I watched on TV 3 nights ago I would really struggle to tell you. Without sounding like a hippy, I think fishing wakes the mind, creative parts anyway and you really feel alive and like there is a real purpose to what you are doing.

Great pictures Chris and your writing skills are brilliant always able submerse myself when reading your write ups or reports. Your passion for fishing clearly portrays itself well done fella.
Thank's a lot mate. Lacking a bit of inspiration at the moment, but I have some trips lined up that are consuming most of my thoughts.

Good post, I know exactly where you're coming from. I follow your page on Facebook and like reading what you put there and the photos are brilliant. A mate of mine who likes walking a lot, knows where some of your marks are and we hope to fish some of them, fantastic part of our coast.
If you need some help and you are over this way, give me a shout. Cheers
 
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That's absolutely true...
Was that an old Chinese adage? I heard a great one on a documentary about China the other night, but can't remember it. Have you watched "A river runs through it?" I think the film encapsulates the way I feel about fishing.






Sounds like you have had an interesting life Rab, particularly leaving Iran with the falling of the Shah. I just think I remember a fishing session years ago vividly, but if you asked me what I watched on TV 3 nights ago I would really struggle to tell you. Without sounding like a hippy, I think fishing wakes the mind, creative parts anyway and you really feel alive and like there is a real purpose to what you are doing.



Thank's a lot mate. Lacking a bit of inspiration at the moment, but I have some trips lined up that are consuming most of my thoughts.



If you need some help and you are over this way, give me a shout. Cheers
Thanks for the offer, I hope to take you up on it. Used to do a lot of rock fishing in Alderney, but having a family and business got in the way of my travels.
 
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Thanks for the offer, I hope to take you up on it. Used to do a lot of rock fishing in Alderney, but having a family and business got in the way of my travels.
I have been over there, but Steve who I fish with has been 20 odd times. It's my favourite type of fishing. Herm is still my favourite Channel Island though.
 
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I have been over there, but Steve who I fish with has been 20 odd times. It's my favourite type of fishing. Herm is still my favourite Channel Island though.
Not been there for twenty five years, I've been told it's a shadow of its former self, fishing wise.
 
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Not been there for twenty five years, I've been told it's a shadow of its former self, fishing wise.
You're right, signs of the times, over fishing. I think that's why Steve has switched to Norway. We are off on the 7th March. Can't wait.
 

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Great read as ever, not sure if fishing is in the blood but I'm sure it's in the brain. Started when I was 14 and loved nearly every minute of it. Have had times when you start to feel it's no fun any more and not fished some weeks, but after a couple of weeks not fishing I've always been drawn back to the sea

Sure a lot of people have the same feelings, work all week, and the brain is racing, worrying about this and that, Hit the beach, sit down relax and within an hour the mind is clear. Catching fish is a bonus.
Have met some great people and great anglers, who have freely shared knowledge and advice and time, a real rare thing in a busy world,
I would say fishing is one of the few areas where there is still a community spirit. Can not imagine say Usain Bolt congratulating someone for running 100 metres in 20 seconds but an angler catches say a 4 lb PB bass and is genuinely congratulated by others who have achieved many doubles.

Spent a week in Norway last year in April catching cod upto 26 lb. got back late Friday night and the next day was back fishing a beach where there was little chance of anything over a pound.
Why? I don't know, but just had to do it

Good luck with your Norway trip hope the weather and fishing goes well
 
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Great read as ever, not sure if fishing is in the blood but I'm sure it's in the brain. Started when I was 14 and loved nearly every minute of it. Have had times when you start to feel it's no fun any more and not fished some weeks, but after a couple of weeks not fishing I've always been drawn back to the sea

Sure a lot of people have the same feelings, work all week, and the brain is racing, worrying about this and that, Hit the beach, sit down relax and within an hour the mind is clear. Catching fish is a bonus.
Have met some great people and great anglers, who have freely shared knowledge and advice and time, a real rare thing in a busy world,
I would say fishing is one of the few areas where there is still a community spirit. Can not imagine say Usain Bolt congratulating someone for running 100 metres in 20 seconds but an angler catches say a 4 lb PB bass and is genuinely congratulated by others who have achieved many doubles.

Spent a week in Norway last year in April catching cod upto 26 lb. got back late Friday night and the next day was back fishing a beach where there was little chance of anything over a pound.
Why? I don't know, but just had to do it

Good luck with your Norway trip hope the weather and fishing goes well

Cheers Colin. It's just so addictive... I can't get away from it. You are right, there is a great commerarderie between anglers. It's just a shame there is that proportion that get chewed up when they see someone catch a fish they would like, but I guess that behaviour is in every walk of life.

I wish my brother was more interested in it, when I think about him and I pitted against eachother tearing around Herm island for a week trying to get diferent fish and being all secretive about where we had been. This exact banter is going on at the moment, we have decided whoever is last on our norway trip has to do a fishing tutorial vid for youtube in a mankini. High stakes... You have to keep a straight face while teaching people to shad fish, there is a script. ;)
 
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Sounds like you have had an interesting life Rab, particularly leaving Iran with the falling of the Shah. I just think I remember a fishing session years ago vividly, but if you asked me what I watched on TV 3 nights ago I would really struggle to tell you. Without sounding like a hippy, I think fishing wakes the mind, creative parts anyway and you really feel alive and like there is a real purpose to what you are doing.
that is me to a tee. couldn't tell you what i had for breakfast , but can remember catching a gurnard when i was about 4 on the only boat trip i went on the clyde when a kid ,and watching it walk along the shallow bottom next to where we landed the boat when i put it back.

at certain times, and all the time when i match fished my head was full of fishing 24/7. even today i will mention a trip from years ago to a mate i will be fishing with, telling him what he caught that night and what we all ended up with and any funnies that happened . one mate ricky cannot believe the things i remember from fishing trips 20 years ago,but i remind him that he knows what date his kids were born and things like wedding anniversaries !
cheers rab
 

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Brilliant as always Chris .......... but amazed that you left the cave picture out ......... definitely one of my favs.

I assume that there'll be a book to follow at some point soon ?

Cheers,
Dave
 
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Brilliant as always Chris .......... but amazed that you left the cave picture out ......... definitely one of my favs.

I assume that there'll be a book to follow at some point soon ?

Cheers,
Dave
Cheers Dave. Was trying to use pics not in other recent blogs. Was a bit of a spur of the moment blog.

Just on my way to Orkney....
 
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Have a great one mate - cant wait to read all about it.

Cheers
Dave
Dads 70th, had to fight to be able to take a T800, they want to spin for trout only. Weather looks iffy. They said no bait at all in the car, I have 1kg of frozen herring hidden.
 
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