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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone, I've been looking at the shimano tranx 401a on line, I've watched quite a few you tube videos, but i cant work out the free spool arrangement on the tranx. On all my other reels there is either a lever or button to operate the free spool, which you can operate while keeping your thumb on the spool to stop it running out. The tranx seems to have a thumb bar which you depress, but I cant see from the videos wether you can thumb the spool or if the bar is held down and then released to let the line out. Can anyone with a tranx enlighten me?, also how do you rate the reel?
 

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I assumed all baitcaster reels with a thumb bar are the same, you press it down to disengage the spool for casting while holding the spool with your thumb (it's all very easy and natural to do), you cast, then when you turn the handle to start your retrieve the gearing kicks in and re-engages the spool. That's how it is on my Daiwa Lexa.

TranX is highly rated in the pike lure fishing world, it's seen as the cream of the crop.
 

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I have one of these (the 401) and the thumbar remains locked down when you click it, meaning you can thumb the spool without the bar springing back up. You reengage by turning the handle, and the bar clicks up.
It's my wrecking and heavy bassing reel and it's absolutely brilliant - very smooth with a powerful drag. I bought the high-speed version and that, with the ergonomic handle, make wrecking very comfortable. Look at the wider applications of this reel elsewhere in the world (stripers, dorado and tuna) and you'll see it's a bit more than just a pike reel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have one of these (the 401) and the thumbar remains locked down when you click it, meaning you can thumb the spool without the bar springing back up. You reengage by turning the handle, and the bar clicks up.
It's my wrecking and heavy bassing reel and it's absolutely brilliant - very smooth with a powerful drag. I bought the high-speed version and that, with the ergonomic handle, make wrecking very comfortable. Look at the wider applications of this reel elsewhere in the world (stripers, dorado and tuna) and you'll see it's a bit more than just a pike reel.
thanks for that marktheshark, I was looking for a reel for reef and wreck pollacking, currently I use an Abu 7001i and was thinking the 301/401 might be a good replacement
 

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I'd consider the high-speed 401 (high-speed works better as the spools on these reels are small and it can take an age to wind up at the end of the drift on a normally-geared one). I imported mine from Austria.
I find the whole baitcaster thing ergonomic - it frees your hands to do a fixed task without swapping over. I'm right handed but use a LHW reel, so, my right hand holds the rod, my right thumb controls the freespool, and my left hand does the winding. No need to swap hands or juggle. The low profile means everything's compact. And the light weight means your arms aren't knackered after a long day on the wrecks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'd consider the high-speed 401 (high-speed works better as the spools on these reels are small and it can take an age to wind up at the end of the drift on a normally-geared one). I imported mine from Austria.
I find the whole baitcaster thing ergonomic - it frees your hands to do a fixed task without swapping over. I'm right handed but use a LHW reel, so, my right hand holds the rod, my right thumb controls the freespool, and my left hand does the winding. No need to swap hands or juggle. The low profile means everything's compact. And the light weight means your arms aren't knackered after a long day on the wrecks.
Totally agree with you on the whole left hand wind scenario, I'm right handed but have always used left hand wind multipliers. Your strong arm is controlling the rod, your right hand is dealing with the reel, and all your left hand has to do is turn the reel handle. Was out on a boat last week, and as usual most anglers were using right hand wind reels, they're swapping rod from hand to hand, most seem to tuck the rod under therir right arm, hold the foregrip with the left hand, and reel with the right hand, which is uncomfortable at best, often when they hook a good fish the left arm soon weakens and there swapping the rod over and in one instance the angler turned the rod upside down and reeled backwards.
Just one thing going by the specs the high gear retrieves 38 inches of line, which is fast, but doesn't that meaning you are reeling very very slowly to work a lure at a good speed?
 

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I don't use it for lure fishing (ie spinning) ... it's for drift fishing and wrecking in which case I use mostly Portland rigs; the tide/current makes the lure work.
If you're retrieving Redgills then yes, you wind slowly - but a hungry pollack is quite capable of swimming faster than I can retrieve if it wants to!
The high-speed is very useful when you've got to retrieve at the end of the drift. If you're in 100ft-plus of water it can be tiring with a small multi unless it's got the high gearing.
 
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