World Sea Fishing Forums banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just about got my boat ready for launching, problem is I have never launched a boat from a trailer before. . Having only had swinging mooring at Portsmouth before.
So I was wondering if anyone could recommend a suitable slipway to start on. .somewhere between Brighton and gosport as that's my area.. not too tricky or crowded as I just want to practice a bit.

Thanks in advance

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Let me know how you get on as I'm in the same boat ( such a cliche on here I'm sure) what outfit have you been working on? I realise this is prob better as a pm??! Sorry
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
367 Posts
Google maps identify some then go and have a look preferably at low water. I need to find some quite spots purely to practise reversing a trailer, I am absolutely useless!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,501 Posts
Its easy enough to reverse a trailer as long as you do everything slowly. Start at what you think is a slow pace then half it and you should be about right. Going too fast is what causes most problems. Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,873 Posts
bedhampton slipway in langstone harbour is a nice easy slip to launch from but is tidal.

you also need a key from the local council to open the gate which is free to get but if you lose it you have to pay for another.

the reason for the gate is to stop any vans fly tipping and stop the pikeys getting in with there caravans.

i used to use the slip way a lot but my boat is now moored in haslar marina.

also worth looking at northney marina on hayling.

they do a yearly pass to use there slip and leave your trailer in the yard whilst your out.

not sure how much the yearly pass is but i think its around £240.

you get to use the facilities there as well i think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Loads of vids on utube and step by step instructions on the net.
Just write down the steps and follow.
Just prepare all your kit away from the ramp, otherwise your feel rushed if others are waiting. And as above just take it slowly. Just ABC stuff, plug in, you'll be surprised how much water get in your boat through that little hole, outboard raised, don't want that clipping the bottom, and rope round bow post, otherwise your pride and joy will float away.
The tricky bit is reversing down the ramp but after a few goes it will be easy as riding a bike.
And if there's any others launching they'll hep you if you want, just ask.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Pick a nice weekend, sit by the slipway of choice, and watch everyone else do it. You'll soon learn what makes the good launchers good, and what makes the numpties, well, not so good...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,487 Posts
In my past experience things that can make launching go wrong. Most are around haste and the winch.

If your winch is cable (not strap) and the last retrieve too much cable was played out then you can get a loose wind followed by a tight wind. When subsequently launching the boat the tight wind can get ensnared in the loose wind below and leave you battling with the winch. If in doubt always check the winch cable is even before launching before by playing out and rewinding.
A common error also lies in the eye bolt and winch and / or safety hooks. If the hooks are slightly too large they are easy enough to attach but when under tension or have been under tension i.e. the boat has slipped down the trailer some, taking them off can be a mission and means taking in on the main winch and a lot of faffing about to get them off (difficult to describe but think of a bunch of keys when one key somehow manages to slip through the holding keyring and you're trying to figure out how to get enough slack to get the damn thing back out) As a result my preference was to always have the safety chain on a D shackle at the trailer end. Just in case I needed to remove it in a hurry.

When it comes to retrieving the biggest headache if you have a swell or cross current is getting the boat lined up squarely. To this end, these are brilliant and worth every penny of their extortionate cost. Better even if you could make your own and stick a toffee to the thieving gits, but they are good..... Floatem Poles http://www.floatempoles.co.uk/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks guys for all your suggestions and tips. . Anyone used hardway slip?
It's quite sheltered and it doesn't seem to be very busy. . And it's free lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,248 Posts
Pick a nice weekend, sit by the slipway of choice, and watch everyone else do it. You'll soon learn what makes the good launchers good, and what makes the numpties, well, not so good...
Nothing like learning from sombody elses mistakes !:)

The worst thing for us was green algae on the slip, it sometimes pays (with smaller boats) to put the trailer on a stout rope off the tow bar to keep the towing vehicle above it .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
When I was in your position, I sat by my chosen launch site and watched others till I was confident I knew what I was going to do. This site http://www.boatlaunch.co.uk/ gives some information about various slipways. I have not used Hardway but it is only usable around high tide. I usually use the one in Stokes Bay next to the lifeboat which can be tricky with a SW wind and busy in the Summer. If you just wanted to practice somewhere quiet then there is one by the scout hut where Little Angelsey Road meets Park Road in Gosport; it is very sheltered but only only usable at high water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Another vote for Northney, it's where I learnt after my 1st launch in Langstone nearly ended in my boat being taken away by the strong tide!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,292 Posts
Like others above, i would say go and have a look at others.
Ensure you are competent at reversing.
Have someone watch and guide you.
The first time you will be nervous but take your time.
You will soon be letting the boat off the back with a sharp brake before your wheel hubs are wet.

One thing on retrieval ensure your trailer is in enough water so the boat just slides on with ease.
The first time i tried to get my boat out it the trailer was not in the water enough and it was hard work to get it on, learnt for next time.
I have even seen someone pull the winch holding leg completely off the trailer frame when struugling to winch on due to not in enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
As I only have a front wheel drive van I carry a tow strap rated to about 7ton so I can keep my wheels on dry ground if it's low tide at my slipway. Cheap on eBay and also saves putting your car in salt water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
simpsons at Newhaven will launch it for you ---------and you can see how its done
+1 for this idea. It will cost only £15 and you can see them do it with your own boat and trailer. Same again for retrieving at the end of the day. If not at Simpsons, many other Marinas along the south coast have their own slip and launching facilities. You may consider the money well spent as a training fee.

If you do decide to have a go yourself, take a buddy who can help out if you get in bother. Choose a weekday as you're less likely to have a queue of people waiting for you and you can take all the time you want. Try and use a time of day with the tide well up so you have plenty of water on the ramp. Be careful if using a FWD car as my van got stuck on a slippy slipway once and I had to get a Landrover to pull it back up the seaweedy ramp! 4x4 are a safer bet. Automatics are useful too as these are less likely to roll backwards with the weight of the boat. If you can find a hosepipe nearby you can wash down your wet bits after launch to get the salty water off brakes and bearings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Hi Jim,
What trailer - roller-coaster or bunk? For a bunk trailer, you'll have to effectively float the boat off and that means backing in quite deep. On a shallower angled slip, you'll be either wetting the car wheels or you'll have to unhitch and push the trailer in and rope it back out. Don't try that on a steep slip!
For a roller-coaster it takes a touch more experience to judge when you are deep enough to launch without the bottom of the transom or the keel grounding as you launch. The objective, on a braked rollercoaster trailer at least, is to avoid wetting the brakes if at all possible. Brake components and seawater are an unhappy mix so make sure you flush them with fresh water asap.
Another point on steeper slips is traction. If you've only got front wheel drive and are unable to break the inertia and get the rig rolling without just wheelspinning, try a chock behind the trailer wheels. Saves you having to juggle handbrake, clutch and revs. Also try starting with the steering well off centre and straighten up quickly as the clutch bites, it again helps minimise wheelspin.
In the Langstone area, the eastney and harbourmaster slips are accessible for pretty much all stages of tide but they're steep and eastney in particular can be badly silted whilst Hayling side suffers from a wicked cross-tide mid-flood. I'd avoid these until you've built up some confidence but after that, they're worth a look.

As folks have said, pick a quiet time (pretty well any time in February!!), take your time and be careful. There's a lot of force involved with winching and towing out.

Steve
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top