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Evening all - hopefully by the time I post this I shall be the proud owner of a spanking new (to me anyway) 1997 Orkney Strikeliner - Yippee. That was the easy bit. Although in very good clean and VERY tidy order the boat has zero equipment.
I have had basic speed boat 'runabouts' in the past but need to kit this one out properly PRIOR to using her - So - any qualified recommendations for the following will be much appreciated -
1 spare auxillary outboard - the boat has a cantilever bracket but long or STD shaft ??? What hp is sensible and recommended makes / models. - Main engine is a four stroke Honda.
Flare pack? Radio hand held and what course do I need to take? First aid kit - probebly work that one out myself - Fishfinder - Lighting - not that I intend to be out after dark. Life jackets. I have a hand held e trek GPS which might be of use in the short term. Sorry to ask all this but what I need to know is what you guys have learned works, rather than whats trendy.
Used kit over new - Obviously having shelled out for the boat my stock of Browinie points is dwindling fast so any secand hand recommendations most welcome. Thats all I can think of.
Many thanks Steve
 

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hi mate contact your nearest branch of the R.N.L.I and they will do a free safety checK and tell you what they reccomend, then with your list you can go to boat jumbles etc and get the gear you want, You should find them on the web easy enough, Try and find a small boat club near you they will always help and usualy have a good social life as well stay safe and good luck
 

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Check out the RNLI site for info on safety and recomended gear, there are some interactive quizzes on buoyage and rules of the road etc. The Sea Safe guys are very knowledgable and approachable, their aim is to make you safe so pick their brains. They only give recomendations, nothing is compulsory.

The RYA administer the courses you can take for seamanship so a look at their site to see what is on offer is worth the time, you will also find details and requirements for the Vhf course there.

Your size boat needs to exhibit a white light, thats all, a torch complies with the regulations. However I would suggest an all round anchor light set as high as possible on your cuddy top.

Make sure you have all the safety gear, including another means of propulsion besides the main engine, a 5hp would be ideal for you. A small kicker engine will not get you a great distance but will get you out of trouble. VHF, life jacket for each person on board, flares, engine spares and tools, chart, fire extinguisher, bailer, compass,first aid kit .....................

On the subject of safety, get to know your engines, do some basic work on them, it will be a lot easier if you know what is under the cover than having a look for the first time a mile offshore.

Have a think about how you would get back on board if you fell over fully clothed. Try it for real, it is not easy without a ladder. If you have a regular mate to go fishing with get him to do the same courses, if you fall overboard or took seriously ill it is no good having someone else there if they do not know what to do. If you have power trim you can use this to get someone out of the water.

There is no limit on how far it is safe to go out, that is down to you, the conditions, your experience and common sense. When you feel you are too far offshore........you are. The limiting factor is the fuel you carry when conditions are spot on. Work on thirds, one third fuel going out, when that it used go no further. One third in theory will then see you back but if wind and tide are against you you will dip into the remaining third, your reserve.

Two anchors are good both with at least a boat length of heavy chain and rope at least 3 times the depth you intend to fish. Bruce are a good anchor allthough I prefer CQR, depends what you have confidence with. For a second anchor I would choose a Danforth, they hold well in sand, mud and store flat and as a bonus are not a heavy anchor. The folding grapnels are hopeless IMHO,they are usefull as an angel if your anchor is dragging though. All patterns are hit and miss if you are trying to anchor over rock or heavy weed/kelp except the traditional fishermans which is superb, get one with a removable stock and it will also store flat. It will need to be a big one if you want to use it on sand or mud though. Check out a chart of the area you intend to fish and see what the bottom is, choose your anchors from there. Think about how you are going to retrieve the anchor, on a small boat the easiest is an alderney ring or lazy line if you are not confident with the ring.

Get out with someone who will show you the basics if you can, there is no substitute for some hands on with someone to steer you if it starts to go wrong. .

Have a think about joining a small boat club as Gus says, some of the members will be willing to help you out with advice and they quite often sell gear when they upgrade. There is a wealth of knowledge there some good and some bad, up to you what you listen to. You can save yourself a lot by listening as they will have made the expensive mistakes before.


Good luck and I hope you enjoy your boat as much as I do.
 
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