World Sea Fishing Forums banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,780 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have put this on another thread but i may as well get as many answers as i can.
A couple of mates and me have a small 12ft dingy/rowing boat. Moored and used regularly with Oars, it does take a good bit of weight (we have had 4 on it with a shed load of shore tackle)
We want to start using it in areas such as Portland Harbour and Swanage bay with an outboard.
so all you experienced boaty types, what is the minimum amount of equipment you would reccomend.
I reckon throw bags in place of a safety ring to save room. I know we need inshore flares and we have a fishfinder/depth thingy
can we get away with mobile phones in place of hand held VHF.
I know we need life jackets and small anchor.
Maximun outboard for a 12ft?
it does have a solid Transom i know that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
Personally, I would never only use mobile phones. They can be a good back up at certain times, I do carry one, but there is no substitute for a VHF. It is a must. Would also recommend a seconed VHF as a back up before phones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,527 Posts
Inshore flare pack
Life jacket each (not buoyancy aid)
(floating cushion)
Handheld VHF and the operators certificate, don't try and use it without
Mobile phone as a backup
Fishfinder
local chart
compass
torch even in daytime
Outboard - 5hp for 12 foot is plenty unless you have a planing hull
fuel
spare fuel
Bucket, bailer and sponge
Anchor, chain and rope
More rope for mooring or a tow
Oars
Basic tool kit
String
basic first aid kit
sun-block and sensible clothing for the weather
and...my book "Angling Boats"!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Salar
Could you please explane your comment about not useing a v.h.f without a certificate, as surely in a emergency any means of calling for help is acceptable?
Mouse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
I have done a course on VHF and gained my "licence", I may be wrong, but I think it is illegal to transmit on a VHF frequency without one! You will also learn how to use it proberly!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,780 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Inshore flare pack
Life jacket each (not buoyancy aid)
(floating cushion)
Handheld VHF and the operators certificate, don't try and use it without
Mobile phone as a backup
Fishfinder
local chart
compass
torch even in daytime
Outboard - 5hp for 12 foot is plenty unless you have a planing hull
fuel
spare fuel
Bucket, bailer and sponge
Anchor, chain and rope
More rope for mooring or a tow
Oars
Basic tool kit
String
basic first aid kit
sun-block and sensible clothing for the weather
and...my book "Angling Boats"!
thankyou for that, thank you all in fact.
as for your book Salar, no problem mate, just as soon as you buy some Moonfleet rigs:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,557 Posts
Echo the previous advice, plus:

You need a vhf cerstificut for the boat and one for the operator to conform to the law. If you have the vhf and get into a mayday situation I don't think not having 2 bits of paper would stop me using it. You don't need the operators one if you only listen and don't transmit.

The other thing with VHF the coastguard has direction finding equipment, they can get your approximate position from the signal so can direct emergency services to you, they can't do the same with mobiles as quickly, it is possible but takes much more time.

To comply with Col Regs you need a white light on a boat this size that can be shown all round, ie. torch, and an efficient sound signal for fog, ie. whistle.

6hp absolute max 10hp depending on the hull would be the biggest I would strap on the back of it. You will push it along easily with a 4hp though

Keep your eye on the strand line on shore and collect all the washed up fenders and buoys. Fix the fenders to the outside of the boat like the tubes on a RIB and use some netting to secure the buoys under the thwarts. This will give you a reserve of buoyancy for safety.

Normal advice is to fix your anchor rope to a strong point on the boat, I disagree with this, my anchor ropes all terminate with a buoy. The reason is if someone is on a collision course with me I am a coward, I don't argue, I move. Having a buoy on the end of the line means I can dump the anchor, I don't waste time hauling it. When the danger is passed I can go back and pick it and resume fishing.

Get out there and enjoy it, I started with a 10 foot dinghy and a Seagull outboard and loved every minute of it.

The main bit of kit is that lump between the shoulders, listen to it, that voice that tells you it is too rough for example. It is always right, and you never want to hear it say "told you so".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,780 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Echo the previous advice, plus:

You need a vhf cerstificut for the boat and one for the operator to conform to the law. If you have the vhf and get into a mayday situation I don't think not having 2 bits of paper would stop me using it. You don't need the operators one if you only listen and don't transmit.

The other thing with VHF the coastguard has direction finding equipment, they can get your approximate position from the signal so can direct emergency services to you, they can't do the same with mobiles as quickly, it is possible but takes much more time.

To comply with Col Regs you need a white light on a boat this size that can be shown all round, ie. torch, and an efficient sound signal for fog, ie. whistle.

6hp absolute max 10hp depending on the hull would be the biggest I would strap on the back of it. You will push it along easily with a 4hp though

Keep your eye on the strand line on shore and collect all the washed up fenders and buoys. Fix the fenders to the outside of the boat like the tubes on a RIB and use some netting to secure the buoys under the thwarts. This will give you a reserve of buoyancy for safety.

Normal advice is to fix your anchor rope to a strong point on the boat, I disagree with this, my anchor ropes all terminate with a buoy. The reason is if someone is on a collision course with me I am a coward, I don't argue, I move. Having a buoy on the end of the line means I can dump the anchor, I don't waste time hauling it. When the danger is passed I can go back and pick it and resume fishing.

Get out there and enjoy it, I started with a 10 foot dinghy and a Seagull outboard and loved every minute of it.

The main bit of kit is that lump between the shoulders, listen to it, that voice that tells you it is too rough for example. It is always right, and you never want to hear it say "told you so".
Ah Chris 4hp eh?
about the size of the one you gave me:) Thankyou I was going to use that as a spare! not now old bean.
Fenders? ok What the bloody hell is a Thwart?
I have a fog horn
VHS it is then
It does have boyancy at either end which is secure, and i also have a drain plug
(thanks again Chris)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,557 Posts
:) :) Sorry. Thwart is the seat that goes from side to side, normally on this size of boat, the bit you sit on to row.

I have a spare fixed VHF here you can have if you want it when you come up this way.You will need an ariel and somewhere to fix it that is away from water, it is not a waterproof version. You may be better with a waterproof handheld with your proximity to a coastguard station, up to you. Saves you fixing an ariel, difficult to do on an open boat. Handheld is good for about 5 miles, fixed for about 15 to 20 on an open boat, depends on how high you can get the ariel.

I can find you an anchor as well, I have a folding grapnell I found on the beach that will be OK for you, no way I am posting it to you though.:uhuh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,780 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
:) :) Sorry. Thwart is the seat that goes from side to side, normally on this size of boat, the bit you sit on to row.

I have a spare fixed VHF here you can have if you want it when you come up this way.You will need an ariel and somewhere to fix it that is away from water, it is not a waterproof version. You may be better with a waterproof handheld with your proximity to a coastguard station, up to you. Saves you fixing an ariel, difficult to do on an open boat. Handheld is good for about 5 miles, fixed for about 15 to 20 on an open boat, depends on how high you can get the ariel.

I can find you an anchor as well, I have a folding grapnell I found on the beach that will be OK for you, no way I am posting it to you though.:uhuh:
er cough silly me! of course i have a thwart, although why you cannot simply call it a seat is quite frankly beyond me lol.
we will get a hand held mate, i have no bloody intrention of going more than a mile offshore and will think twice before doing that.:boat:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,143 Posts
just a quick note about mobiles what has been said about them being your primarary comunnication device is correct but it does pay to carry a fully charged mobile phone particulary close in there is an awfull lot of areas that are complete blackspots around our area as radio signals are pretty much line of site its ok talking to other boat users in the bay if you want the coastguard and you are fishing in the shadow of a 200ft cliff the mobile can be a lifesaver
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,143 Posts
Echo the previous advice, plus:

You need a vhf cerstificut for the boat and one for the operator to conform to the law. If you have the vhf and get into a mayday situation I don't think not having 2 bits of paper would stop me using it. You don't need the operators one if you only listen and don't transmit.

The other thing with VHF the coastguard has direction finding equipment, they can get your approximate position from the signal so can direct emergency services to you, they can't do the same with mobiles as quickly, it is possible but takes much more time.

To comply with Col Regs you need a white light on a boat this size that can be shown all round, ie. torch, and an efficient sound signal for fog, ie. whistle.

6hp absolute max 10hp depending on the hull would be the biggest I would strap on the back of it. You will push it along easily with a 4hp though

Keep your eye on the strand line on shore and collect all the washed up fenders and buoys. Fix the fenders to the outside of the boat like the tubes on a RIB and use some netting to secure the buoys under the thwarts. This will give you a reserve of buoyancy for safety.

Normal advice is to fix your anchor rope to a strong point on the boat, I disagree with this, my anchor ropes all terminate with a buoy. The reason is if someone is on a collision course with me I am a coward, I don't argue, I move. Having a buoy on the end of the line means I can dump the anchor, I don't waste time hauling it. When the danger is passed I can go back and pick it and resume fishing.

Get out there and enjoy it, I started with a 10 foot dinghy and a Seagull outboard and loved every minute of it.

The main bit of kit is that lump between the shoulders, listen to it, that voice that tells you it is too rough for example. It is always right, and you never want to hear it say "told you so".
chris please correct me if I am wrong i am sure when I did my vhf course I was told anyone can use a set if supervised by the radio operater can you clear that one up mate
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,557 Posts
You are spot on, as long as the certified operator is present anyone can use the set. The licensed user is supposed to ensure anyone operating the set does so correctly.

As I understand it anyway.
 
L

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
You are spot on, as long as the certified operator is present anyone can use the set. The licensed user is supposed to ensure anyone operating the set does so correctly.

As I understand it anyway.
Where would you go to get a VHF operators certificate? Will a sshop selling them do you one or is it more regulated? Does the boat require any form of registration/certification or MOT (Safety cert)? Is it advisable to do course in seamanship/boat driving (especially relevant question if you've ever been in a boat with Ian) ? Sorry for all the questions but for a subject that seems so simple there is a lot to think about.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,527 Posts
Where would you go to get a VHF operators certificate? Will a sshop selling them do you one or is it more regulated? Does the boat require any form of registration/certification or MOT (Safety cert)? Is it advisable to do course in seamanship/boat driving (especially relevant question if you've ever been in a boat with Ian) ? Sorry for all the questions but for a subject that seems so simple there is a lot to think about.

Cheers
You need to attend a 1 day course run by a RYA instructor or equivalent. The cost is about £90 and the licence will last a lifetime. It is well worth it because when you need to use VHF in an emergency you need to know exactly what to do otherwise you are a danger to yourself and others. It is a lot more complex than using a phone. In less extreme circumctances, using VHF incorrectly is heard by everyone on that channel within about 5 miles and they will think you are a total muppet.

Last weekend we heard a RIB owner calling up the Coastguard because he had run out of fuel (silly, but it happens). He had clearly not been on a course and there was soon confusion about who was talking to who and on what channel. Luckily no lives were at risk and he just looked an idiot, but it could have been worse.

It is not essential to go on a course for a small boat handling but you would learn a lot if you did. For larger boats it would be very advisable. RYA run them.
 
A

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Ian, me old mate,

don't forget to put the drain plug in before you launch,:boat:

I had someone help me launch a ski boat one time, not only did he forgot to put the plug in, he'd also forgotten to take the tie-down strap off as well, resulting in the boat sinking, whilst still attached to the trailer,

I'm sure i've got a photo somewhere

Ubd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,187 Posts
I know very little about boats but i think a RYA powerboat course will do you nothing but good. It will teach you how to drop anchor, go alongisde vessels, man over board. How to do high speed maneouvers, and also some helpfull info about tide direction in realtion to travel etc. I did it and it was good fun and very informative. (I only did level 1 though...cant wait to get 5mins to get out and do level2).

Thats all i know about boats so ill let the other more experienced guys fill in the rest.
 
M

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Ian, me old mate,

don't forget to put the drain plug in before you launch,:boat:

I had someone help me launch a ski boat one time, not only did he forgot to put the plug in, he'd also forgotten to take the tie-down strap off as well, resulting in the boat sinking, whilst still attached to the trailer,

I'm sure i've got a photo somewhere

Ubd
Was it something like these urly?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvAHYR5DnZE&mode=related&search=

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0lV75CNw1I&mode=related&search=

The second one has plenty of launching and anchoring tips?...................

Malcolm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,340 Posts
them films crack me up, WISH I COULD SAVE EM TO PLAY ON ME LAP TOP TO PLAY ON ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,THEY ONLY PLAY WHEN CONNECTED TO THE NET?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,780 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Where would you go to get a VHF operators certificate? Will a sshop selling them do you one or is it more regulated? Does the boat require any form of registration/certification or MOT (Safety cert)? Is it advisable to do course in seamanship/boat driving (especially relevant question if you've ever been in a boat with Ian) ? Sorry for all the questions but for a subject that seems so simple there is a lot to think about.

Cheers
cheaky git! Let me just explain this unfortunate incident, we cross the fleet and find ourselves blessed with a tail wind exactly in the direction we needed to go. But, the current was so strong in the opposite direction that it was nigh on impossible to row. Everytime an oar slipped the boat would instantly spin and I (the one with the dodgy knees and brain disorder i might add) had to fight it to get it turned back on course, but here we all are safe and sound lol.

Andy, Your line of work may have some possibilities with the radio course mate.

The boat is Registered with the RNLI and was previously used by a commercial guy for inshore work in Lyme Bay
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top