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I bought some Mustad spreader booms to target flatfish (small turbot/dabs/plaice etc) and was wondering what length traces to use.
Are they intended for 2 short traces fished near the lead or can I rig them with 1 short and maybe 1 long trace. How about fishing a longer 2 hook trace on one side and a short trace on the other?
Any help is appreciated, Nial
 

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I used to use short even lengthed traces,when I tried one short and one long I got massive tangles.I was fishing for sole in the big tidals runs in the Upper Bristol Channel,so in less tide they may work long and short!
 

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If it's the boom where the weight hangs from the centre they were designed to boat fish the gentler tides lowered straight down.
One name for this rig is the 'balanced spreader'
Think that term sums them up. Same length trace (short) on each side, same size hook/bait and if attractors are used just above the hooks use the same on each side.
Very effective for dabs, whiting & codling.
I used one to win a club boat match in the Clyde estuary. No-one else had seen this rig - most thought it amusing. When I had several good codling they had to take it seriously.
Conditions were perfect for the rig - calm, gentle tide, sandy bottom.
As well as the two hooks on the bottom it can pay to have a small baited muppet a couple of feet above the rig.
Lifting the rig slowly off the bottom and then gently back again every few minutes can attract some attention.
Was a popular match rig for dinghy anglers in Kent.
 

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Think of them as a more fixed wishbone type rig. Use them to keep the baits close together, but separated enough so that your snoods can not tangle. Simple really, the wire seems to work really well for whiting, pout and codling off the boat.
 

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If it's the boom where the weight hangs from the centre they were designed to boat fish the gentler tides lowered straight down.
One name for this rig is the 'balanced spreader'
Think that term sums them up. Same length trace (short) on each side, same size hook/bait and if attractors are used just above the hooks use the same on each side.
Very effective for dabs, whiting & codling.
I used one to win a club boat match in the Clyde estuary. No-one else had seen this rig - most thought it amusing. When I had several good codling they had to take it seriously.
Conditions were perfect for the rig - calm, gentle tide, sandy bottom.
As well as the two hooks on the bottom it can pay to have a small baited muppet a couple of feet above the rig.
Lifting the rig slowly off the bottom and then gently back again every few minutes can attract some attention.
Was a popular match rig for dinghy anglers in Kent.
That's probably why I threw mine away after a couple of trips,they only really worked off Cardiff at slack water!
 
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