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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i brought a cheap normal (not fishing kayak) a couple of years ago just to give it a go before investing lots of money and lot getting on with it that well.

the main thing that i struggle with is the stability, especially when there's a bit of a rolling swell. i've made a home made anchor set up to, again to see how i got on before wasting money. i found that as the swell doesn't come towards front of the yak (i found side on usually) it can make it a bit un stable. i think a lot of this issue could be down to me being 6ft 3, feels like i'm making the yak top heavy. been worried a few times that i may go over.

any way a couple of quick and simple questions if i may.

are the purpose made fishing yaks more stable than cheap multi purpose (think mines called a frenzy)?

has anyone tried these Freedom Hawk 14 ex demo Fishing Kayak yellow sea kayak or river lake fishing. | eBay

they look good but are there too many moving parts and are they as stable as they look?
 

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Think you main issue is with you anchor set up! Have you installed an anchor trolley?

Where are you based?

Although I am only just 6ft I am over 18 stone it doesn't make the kayak any more tippy as your legs are the biggest amount of weight, try sitting with a foot either side in the water! No topping out then! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks for the replies.

i did a bit of yaking in south east kent when i lived there. but now live in norfolk, only managed to take it out once in norfolk and that was only drifting when it was calm. hoping to get out more this summer.

i'll try putting my legs either side of the kayak to see if that makes things better.

i have made my own heath robinson anchor trolley. i'm trying to refrain from attaching any add ons that involve screwing into the yak (just using the loops and ties that are already there). i'm trying to get a feel weather i'd like kayak fishing with a cheap bog standard kayak. if i do decide to carry on with it i will buy a yak more suitable to fishing (and permanently attach the add ons) and sell the cheap one. or not bother at all and sell the cheap one. either way it's easier to sell the cheap one with no holes or bits screwed to it.

can see the point about stability being wider and harder to paddle and manoeuvre, hense why i was thinking about the yak in the link that in theory gets the best of both worlds. i've never seem one been used so haven't been able to find any views.
 

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Only difference with a fishing yak is they have rod holders, and more cubby holes etc. nothing to do with stability, that just comes from buying a quality boat, like the tarpons or ocean kayaks. The perfect balance between performance and stability is hard to achieve and a compromise will usually have to be made.
 

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There are lots of stable kayaks but as Crooty says it is a compromise.

The most stable kayak are generally wider and as such slower. This may not seem important but if you have a kayak that you can paddle at a max speed of 3knts and you are against a tide of 2knts then you will only travel at 1knt, then add a wind of 2knts and you are going backwards. :(

Try joining the Anglian Kayak Anglers forum. The owner is Snapper he is one of the most knowledgeable guys in our sport. He and his members are all over Norfolk and Suffolk and will give you loads of advice and show you the ropes.

The most stable kayaks are mainly aimed at 'flatwater' fishing, ie lakes, rivers and estuaries. Many kayaks you may not think are stable when they are correctly rigged and anchored are in fact very stable on the sea.

Meet up with Snapper and his mates and you will not go far wrong.

Terry
 

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Capsizing is I’m afraid, part of kayaking. The key is to be prepared when (not if it happens) because one day it will. So you need to master a deep water re-entry technique before taking to the sea. Personally I’d learn this over going with someone else and relying on them to help.
I’ve capsized twice in seven years once in a rough sea the other flat calm 1km out, both times back on pretty quick.
I wouldn’t consider this so called kayak on the stability question alone. When the wind gets up you need a fast hull to get you ashore and if you fall off, then you get back on and still be home for tea.
 

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The Ocean and Perception range of angling kayaks are not over wide, so are reasonably quick, with good secondary stability. A wide kayak might not be as stable as you think, it will go quickly once past a certain tipping point, whereas a P13 for instance, might feel tippy at first, but is quite hard to push far enough to go over. A cheap chinese brand probably won't have had the R&D that top brands have. Don't skimp on safety for a few quid, not worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thanks for the information and tips.

think i'll have some more time on my current kayak in the summer and make a decision weather to persist and buy a better kayak for winter, or think down the lines of a small boat.

i currently have a standard ocean frenzy kayak. how much better for purpose would you say the fishing kayaks are in comparison? from what i've seen the fishing yaks are longer with more storage, but other than that any other advantages of the purpose made yaks?

thanks all.
 

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A longer kayak is more seaworthy and comfortable, especially at anchor, and quicker. It doesn't have to be an expensive purpose built angling kayak, a used perception freedom kitted out yourself is an excellent fishing kayak. I had a freedom and it was a nice yak.
 

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i currently have a standard ocean frenzy kayak. how much better for purpose would you say the fishing kayaks are in comparison? from what i've seen the fishing yaks are longer with more storage, but other than that any other advantages of the purpose made yaks?

thanks all.
A 13ft + kayak will give you speed and ease of paddling, which may not sound important until you consider trying to make head way into a head wind or tide. Then it's the difference of making slow progress to the beach, compared with going backwards on a short kayak and needing to be rescued.
 

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big guy I'm 6' 5" and 17 stone. Being top heavy I know what you mean, Even with very good balance, I can't sit side ways and fish, sucks. Tips in a matter of seconds. I have a trident 13 and with both legs either side in the water it is very very stable. Just built a rudder to help and for tracking. The best advice i will give is to relax in your seat. if you sit up all tense its unstable, if you proper chill and almost slouch in the seat with relaxed legs its far more stable.

With anchoring diy an anchor trolley get the line up the back and its a lot better.
 

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I have an ocean 11ft prowler and have found it to be great on the sea . I'm 6ft and 15 stone been out up to 1 mile in calm sea no probs only drift fished though! You just need to be sensible ! Check weather if it looks at all iffy Don't go out!!!
 

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Stability is an easily learned skill. You don't need a beamy kayak for it to be stable. These are only 62cm wide. Performance does not HAVE to come at the price of stability, if the kayak is designed properly in the first place.





Sat side saddle and the kayak doesn't even list.





This was Paul hooked up to the first skate caught off a kayak - weighed by Davy Holt at 178lbs.



Another one, alongside on a solo trip



12 miles out with the charter boats, sharking. Sat side saddle.





Over a quarter of a tonne of prime beef on board. Only messing around, she is actually rated for 180kgs



BIG BLOKE and stability - he was 19st plus. This was in Italy. i took 4 down and gave the new owners some on water coaching - the same as I provide to ANY new owner. It is all part of the service.

Fish rough water, including tide races, on purpose.



That's enough for now - but do not think that you have to give up stability for performance and ease of manoevering. I bet you don't think a bicycle is unstable - but that falls over if you let go of it.
 

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Stability is an easily learned skill. You don't need a beamy kayak for it to be stable. These are only 62cm wide. Performance does not HAVE to come at the price of stability, if the kayak is designed properly in the first place.





Sat side saddle and the kayak doesn't even list.





This was Paul hooked up to the first skate caught off a kayak - weighed by Davy Holt at 178lbs.



Another one, alongside on a solo trip



12 miles out with the charter boats, sharking. Sat side saddle.





Over a quarter of a tonne of prime beef on board. Only messing around, she is actually rated for 180kgs



BIG BLOKE and stability - he was 19st plus. This was in Italy. i took 4 down and gave the new owners some on water coaching - the same as I provide to ANY new owner. It is all part of the service.



NO HIS FEET ARE NOT ON THE BOTTOM - this is one of my coaching techniques to get people confident in handling a kayak.





Then I introduce doing the same thing with the paddle.



Fish rough water, including tide races, on purpose. (I suppose I should add the caveat - when you know what you are doing and are confident of your ability - again, part of the ownerhip benefits that come with these kayaks!)



That's enough for now - but do not think that you have to give up stability for performance and ease of manoevering. I bet you don't think a bicycle is unstable - but that falls over if you let go of it.
 
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