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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It had been a month exactly since the last time I had fished, spending 3 weekends outside of the country I had thought about almost nothing other than fishing again. Will & I mulled over the idea of rocky mark, knowing the weather Sat night/Sunday early hours were going to be hell on earth, nothing was to break my enthusiasm or desire to get out in the elements. Will has just received his new lure rod from DFR's and got a Rarenium to couple up to it, so he needed little persuading.

Looking at the weather I was going to need a lot of gear, with it being cold, with strong winds and 10.9mm of rain predicted I had to attempt to get things right or the night would be sheer misery. We set off mid afternoon and as soon as the van stopped for us to get walking the good 2miles to our mark, the heavens opened and the sky went dark. We sat in the van a good half an our just looking at the weather that was greeting us to start our trip. Eventually we spotted a light patch in the sky way off in the distance that was heading toward us, we set off on the long sweaty walk, uphill and down dale, crossing streams, climbing around rocks, exhausting.

We set up camp and after about half an hour decided that in 3 hours time when high tide arrives our beach buddies are likely to be swamped. Losing our nerve we moved spots where we had a decent retreat and a bit of a buffer between us and the pounding surf. The sea was white for about 45 yards and really roaring.

Will went off and started luring, I cast out at dark and quickly began losing rigs. It was unfishable, tide and swell driving rigs and leads into reefs and crevices. I saved what rigs I could and decided to sit it out. It also made sense to get the rod tips down low and tripods a fair distance away as lightening was regularly illuminating sky, though it wasn't that close to us, I was sure Hants and Sussex were going to get the brunt of it.

Both of us agreed despite it being unfishable, it was great to be out in the elements, I think I enjoy the camping as much as the fishing, it's an integral part at least. The wind dropped but the tide wasn't really going out. I wanted it to calm a bit. Will went off to bed about 10, I cast out 3 rods all with big baits in the hope it was now fishable, in reality it wasn't, almost impossible to tell a bite and rig loss continued.
I had a short run on one of the rachets and didn't strike it as the crashing waves were constantly nodding the rod tips, how wrong I was... I saw the tell tell double rattles on the TTR and by the time I hit the rod the likely Conger was already comfy in it's lair. I let some line out in the hope it would venture out, it quickly took up the line and the knocks started again, hit again but ended up losing patience and snapping the line. I think it was advantage Conger in these conditions, they can easily nab your bait when it's that rough and be in a hole before you can confirm it's a bite.

I was defeated, too rough, too many rigs gone, I headed for my bivi as I could see the sky again absent of stars and the expected storm brewing. It was probably 11pm when I fell asleep. I bought an Exped Downmat a month or so back to couple up with my Rab Ascent 900 sleeping bag and it was awesome, warmth from the floor for once and not that cold feeling where you are switching positions to get comfortable & warm. It was toasty in the bag, I was just down to my thermals, out of the wind and relaxing listening to the rain pitter patter. I had about 6 hours kip and that was when woke to the sea roaring louder than ever, I had a quick look so see how far the sea was falling short and was not wild about it, the rain then intensified, it began hammering it down, visibility down to about 50 yards and worst of all the wind switched to SE, naturally our shelters were facing the opposite way to the prevailing SW when we set up, rain was now hammering in the shelter, I just zipped up the bivi like a body bag and peered out. Wind was picking up too and there was a likelihood the shelters could get blown away. Wills got blown over and he grabbed it and mine went in the same ridiculously strong squall. I held the aluminium frame for dear life, managed to get out and turn it northward and resecure it with stones.

Floaty and boots were back on, a river had been running under both out our bivi's, any break in the weather, we'd have to pack up asap and get the hell out of there as what was looming on the horizon wasn't worth hanging about for. The rain went from stair rods to medium strength and we both lept out of out shelters and began legging it about.

BANG.......
Lightening right over head... seriously worrying. I was almost hit in Colombia during a tropical storm in 2004, it hit a car 10-15 yards away and people were screaming, the sound was unreal. Back in the shelters we went after laying the rods down pronto.

Rain was relentless but we carried on packing stuff away, knowing we had a short time frame. Just as I put my rod bag on my back I kid you not Will and I were almost both blown to the floor by a gust that must have been over 50mph from the West, it would have flattened a beach buddy, it blew a few pints of sea water past my ears, I thought "WTF"?? Then more gusts of unreal power. It actually aided part of our long walk back, but I thought what timing, 5 mins later packing up and we'd have had our gear blown all over the beach.

The walk went on forever, we passed a sniper on the way back in a mask and all army gear which was a bit creepy, he was using a suppressor. A short time after we heard muffled sound of him firing. It was the best feeling in the world getting back to the van.
We'd blanked, i'm not ashamed to admit, another adventure. Great to get home for a cup of tea and a hot bath.

 

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epic mate, at least you lived to tell the tale!! The power of nature sometimes is incredible, nice to watch from the comfort of home, scary as hell when caught in the middle of it!!
 

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You need to put a bit more effort in if you want to reap the rewards mate. :thumbs:

Seriously, I love reading your reports, lost myself for a few minutes there, very enjoyable and fair play to you mate. :thumbs:
 

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Great report. Hard luck on the blank. Well done on surviving the night!!:thumbs:
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
epic mate, at least you lived to tell the tale!! The power of nature sometimes is incredible, nice to watch from the comfort of home, scary as hell when caught in the middle of it!!
Disconcerting, it builds character alright. There's always next week. Thanks pal.

You need to put a bit more effort in if you want to reap the rewards mate. :thumbs:

Seriously, I love reading your reports, lost myself for a few minutes there, very enjoyable and fair play to you mate. :thumbs:
Cheers Ben, I was knackered writing it, I try to give as much detail, that way in 50 years from now the words might just bring the session back to life for me.

great report chris,unlucky on the blank,, but once in a while its great to be out in those conditions as it really gets your addrenalin pumping,, you look forward to getting home in the warmth then once your back you wish you were still there
It was exciting, not in the same league as you being stuck in quicksand in Poole Harbour and me pulling you out though Jason. Funny day that was.

Great report. Hard luck on the blank. Well done on surviving the night!!:thumbs:
Blanks are part of fishing. Might of picked up some small stuff if i'd been scratching with a flapper, but even so they would have hooked themselves as bite detection was zero in those rough seas. Thanks
 
G

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
yes i remember that day well, we then went to quite an upmarket pub before going for the flounders,we were all covered in mud and sludge, every one else had all the desiegner gear on, but thankfully i think they thought we were in fancy dress
That pint was the best part of the day by far. Freezing it was & no flounders.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
its surprising what we do when desperate to go fishing , well written report mate , regards
 

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It had been a month exactly since the last time I had fished, spending 3 weekends outside of the country I had thought about almost nothing other than fishing again. Will & I mulled over the idea of rocky mark, knowing the weather Sat night/Sunday early hours were going to be hell on earth, nothing was to break my enthusiasm or desire to get out in the elements. Will has just received his new lure rod from DFR's and got a Rarenium to couple up to it, so he needed little persuading.

Looking at the weather I was going to need a lot of gear, with it being cold, with strong winds and 10.9mm of rain predicted I had to attempt to get things right or the night would be sheer misery. We set off mid afternoon and as soon as the van stopped for us to get walking the good 2miles to our mark, the heavens opened and the sky went dark. We sat in the van a good half an our just looking at the weather that was greeting us to start our trip. Eventually we spotted a light patch in the sky way off in the distance that was heading toward us, we set off on the long sweaty walk, uphill and down dale, crossing streams, climbing around rocks, exhausting.

We set up camp and after about half an hour decided that in 3 hours time when high tide arrives our beach buddies are likely to be swamped. Losing our nerve we moved spots where we had a decent retreat and a bit of a buffer between us and the pounding surf. The sea was white for about 45 yards and really roaring.

Will went off and started luring, I cast out at dark and quickly began losing rigs. It was unfishable, tide and swell driving rigs and leads into reefs and crevices. I saved what rigs I could and decided to sit it out. It also made sense to get the rod tips down low and tripods a fair distance away as lightening was regularly illuminating sky, though it wasn't that close to us, I was sure Hants and Sussex were going to get the brunt of it.

Both of us agreed despite it being unfishable, it was great to be out in the elements, I think I enjoy the camping as much as the fishing, it's an integral part at least. The wind dropped but the tide wasn't really going out. I wanted it to calm a bit. Will went off to bed about 10, I cast out 3 rods all with big baits in the hope it was now fishable, in reality it wasn't, almost impossible to tell a bite and rig loss continued.
I had a short run on one of the rachets and didn't strike it as the crashing waves were constantly nodding the rod tips, how wrong I was... I saw the tell tell double rattles on the TTR and by the time I hit the rod the likely Conger was already comfy in it's lair. I let some line out in the hope it would venture out, it quickly took up the line and the knocks started again, hit again but ended up losing patience and snapping the line. I think it was advantage Conger in these conditions, they can easily nab your bait when it's that rough and be in a hole before you can confirm it's a bite.

I was defeated, too rough, too many rigs gone, I headed for my bivi as I could see the sky again absent of stars and the expected storm brewing. It was probably 11pm when I fell asleep. I bought an Exped Downmat a month or so back to couple up with my Rab Ascent 900 sleeping bag and it was awesome, warmth from the floor for once and not that cold feeling where you are switching positions to get comfortable & warm. It was toasty in the bag, I was just down to my thermals, out of the wind and relaxing listening to the rain pitter patter. I had about 6 hours kip and that was when woke to the sea roaring louder than ever, I had a quick look so see how far the sea was falling short and was not wild about it, the rain then intensified, it began hammering it down, visibility down to about 50 yards and worst of all the wind switched to SE, naturally our shelters were facing the opposite way to the prevailing SW when we set up, rain was now hammering in the shelter, I just zipped up the bivi like a body bag and peered out. Wind was picking up too and there was a likelihood the shelters could get blown away. Wills got blown over and he grabbed it and mine went in the same ridiculously strong squall. I held the aluminium frame for dear life, managed to get out and turn it northward and resecure it with stones.

Floaty and boots were back on, a river had been running under both out our bivi's, any break in the weather, we'd have to pack up asap and get the hell out of there as what was looming on the horizon wasn't worth hanging about for. The rain went from stair rods to medium strength and we both lept out of out shelters and began legging it about.

BANG.......
Lightening right over head... seriously worrying. I was almost hit in Colombia during a tropical storm in 2004, it hit a car 10-15 yards away and people were screaming, the sound was unreal. Back in the shelters we went after laying the rods down pronto.

Rain was relentless but we carried on packing stuff away, knowing we had a short time frame. Just as I put my rod bag on my back I kid you not Will and I were almost both blown to the floor by a gust that must have been over 50mph from the West, it would have flattened a beach buddy, it blew a few pints of sea water past my ears, I thought "WTF"?? Then more gusts of unreal power. It actually aided part of our long walk back, but I thought what timing, 5 mins later packing up and we'd have had our gear blown all over the beach.

The walk went on forever, we passed a sniper on the way back in a mask and all army gear which was a bit creepy, he was using a suppressor. A short time after we heard muffled sound of him firing. It was the best feeling in the world getting back to the van.
We'd blanked, i'm not ashamed to admit, another adventure. Great to get home for a cup of tea and a hot bath.

what can i say chris,absolutly epic,a great report as always from you,if the fish had any incling of what you guys put yourselves through they would do the decent thing and come up the shingle more often,clocks ticking on a belter for you guys im sure,can you pm your number again please mate,ive got to have a weekend on that ground sooner rather than later,keepit up guys....................stunning,simply stunning reporting
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
its surprising what we do when desperate to go fishing , well written report mate , regards
True. The magic of fishing... anyway my gear is almost dry now haha.

Enjoyed the read Chris...and a couple of those photo`s are breathtaking....stay safe. Pete.
Cheers, all phone pics, couldn't take the big cam, too much weight.

Great report, but what the hell someone is doing there with a gun I don't know (should only be army when range closed)?
Either side of the path there are areas where the public are never allowed to go, thats where he went. Seeing as the gate opens at 9am and this was 8am roughly, I think maybe he'd gone for a bit of practice in high winds banking nobody would be about. They can do what they like in the no access areas. Spooked us a bit, I think he was a bit surprised to see anybody too.
 

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When we got down to the beach it screamed bass, but by the time we got to our spot it was dark. Mostly from the clouds, all along the walk i thought to myself i should be luring now. It was dark at about 15:40 because of the clouds! Annoyingly i missed the evening lure session by an hour and because of the following weather the rest of the session....
:nonono:

I tried luring in the dark without my head torch on in 2 meter waves and a sucking swell. had to run a few times as i was in the wash. Almost got taken out by a wave in the dark with 30mph winds all because i wanted to try night lure fishing lol... From time to time Chris flashed his head torch from the distance so i replied 2 flashed just to tell him i was still alive. Decided to stop and wait for the morning as it was hopeless and suicidal. In the beach buddy the ear plugs went in and even downed some night nurse to knock me out, as the sound of the weather and waves were crazy. I woke up in the middle of the night at 02:30 because rain was coming in sideways into the beach buddy that is open at the front. I took off my bivi bag protecting my sleeping bag and rammed it into the top poles of the beach buddy so it was flapping down and put rocks on the base to block out the weather. Went back to sleep... When i woke up at 06:00 i was thankful for my waterproof sleeping bag (without my bivi bag as it was being used as a door) as i was about an inch in flowing water. Dry as a bone in my sleeping bag :thumbs: (Thank you to Snugpak). Realized the world had gone to s**t. I put my breathable waders on to battle what was outside lol. Outside the beach buddy i saw that there was a river coming down the hill side resulting in a waterfall 4 meters behind us and flowing right under Chris's and my shelter...

After the wind knocked our shelters over i quickly half packed my one down and put a football size rock on it to stop it blowing away. Ran back to Chris's and helped him with his shelter. Then milliseconds after we were sorted, that ear deafening overhead crack of lightning hit. it wasn't more than 100 meters away and there was Chris's 13ft lightning conductors vertical 2 yards away from us !!!!! When that happens you don't mess around you got the rods flat fast. Don't even question it. Jump up and do it before the cloud can charge up a new burst. That or flee... We dont flee :marinheir

Just so you understand the wind while lure fishing in the picture the rod was bending 45 degrees just from the wind. Waves were breaking up to 2.5- 3meters and i had to run for cover a few times even in waders. Casting no more than 15-20 yards... Nasty conditions.

On the walk back the sniper looked at me in a kind of where did you come from and why are you out kind of way lol. Amused me lol :icecream:
 
G

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
When we got down to the beach it screamed bass, but by the time we got to our spot it was dark. Mostly from the clouds, all along the walk i thought to myself i should be luring now. It was dark at about 15:40 because of the clouds! Annoyingly i missed the evening lure session by an hour and because of the following weather the rest of the session....
:nonono:

I tried luring in the dark without my head torch on in 2 meter waves and a sucking swell. had to run a few times as i was in the wash. Almost got taken out by a wave in the dark with 30mph winds all because i wanted to try night lure fishing lol... From time to time Chris flashed his head torch from the distance so i replied 2 flashed just to tell him i was still alive. Decided to stop and wait for the morning as it was hopeless and suicidal. In the beach buddy the ear plugs went in and even downed some night nurse to knock me out, as the sound of the weather and waves were crazy. I woke up in the middle of the night at 02:30 because rain was coming in sideways into the beach buddy that is open at the front. I took off my bivi bag protecting my sleeping bag and rammed it into the top poles of the beach buddy so it was flapping down and put rocks on the base to block out the weather. Went back to sleep... When i woke up at 06:00 i was thankful for my waterproof sleeping bag (without my bivi bag as it was being used as a door) as i was about an inch in flowing water. Dry as a bone in my sleeping bag :thumbs: (Thank you to Snugpak). Realized the world had gone to s**t. I put my breathable waders on to battle what was outside lol. Outside the beach buddy i saw that there was a river coming down the hill side resulting in a waterfall 4 meters behind us and flowing right under Chris's and my shelter...

After the wind knocked our shelters over i quickly half packed my one down and put a football size rock on it to stop it blowing away. Ran back to Chris's and helped him with his shelter. Then milliseconds after we were sorted, that ear deafening overhead crack of lightning hit. it wasn't more than 100 meters away and there was Chris's 13ft lightning conductors vertical 2 yards away from us !!!!! When that happens you don't mess around you got the rods flat fast. Don't even question it. Jump up and do it before the cloud can charge up a new burst. That or flee... We dont flee :marinheir

Just so you understand the wind while lure fishing in the picture the rod was bending 45 degrees just from the wind. Waves were breaking up to 2.5- 3meters and i had to run for cover a few times even in waders. Casting no more than 15-20 yards... Nasty conditions.

On the walk back the sniper looked at me in a kind of where did you come from and why are you out kind of way lol. Amused me lol :icecream:
I think the pair of you are totally loopy,but i know where your coming from and i`m jealous......Alan
 

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Riveting report guys, and you did the right thing it seems by getting out of there when you did. That'll be one of those stories that you'll revisit time and time again as it sounds like an epic experience.:thumbs: Glad you are both safe as well.

I got caught outside in a Typhoon No 10 in Hong Kong a few years back and spent 15 minutes just hanging on to a stair rail to stop being blown away as it was impossible to even stand up straight without being knocked over. The power of nature can be awesome at times.

Next time you go back there when it's dead calm and peaceful you'll probably find it hard to believe just how rough it was that night.

John.
 

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Cracking read fella,I luv it when the weathers really bashing it up and your holding on for dear life,and your expecting the next rogue wave to deposit you in the wet stuff,and naturally you retire to a safe distance......but that's just it..you don't..... as watching your rod tips overcomes all safety thoughts.....mad ain't we.....pictures are great by the way.

Gazza
 
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