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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After catching the pollock on Thursday my Gf and I decided to finish our holiday their on the way back to southampton,
Result was 6 garfish.
Last year my Gf caught one and we released it but after reading some recipes I decided the next lot we catch will be dinner.... So here they are,
I knew the bones would turn green but they were surprisingly easy to prep and tasted really nice, like mackerel, just grilled with a little seasoning, my Gf even said with the green bones it's easier to find them lol
 

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Well done:yeah:

Which deck did you fish? I fished the lower deck on Fri and only had Wrasse and a Tompot from under the pier
 

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Why do the bones go green...
You know when you get a bruise and it goes green? It is a Bile Pigment that turns it green, a similar or in fact the same pigment is found in Garfish.

"Biliverdin" is a green tetrapyrrolic bile pigment that is found in the Garfish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Top deck right at the end, and was letting the float drift with the tide/flow all fish caught between 20-60m out, their were guys fishing up their wondering why we were doing so well, they were letting their floats out to 15m out and only about 4-6ft depth and that was it where as ours were always moving, saying that one of them had a pollock about 40cm and a gar so proves if your not catching, watching/asking and changing is the only way you learn and in the long run catch more fish.
Thanks everyone ?
 
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no need to bring food next time you visit Dorset....

When drifting the float out any check on the line, prior to letting more line out, will mean that the current can swing the bait up in the water so you are fishing shallower on occasions; sometimes fish will be caught when the float is checked, then you can shallow the float setting for the next drift out.

I was going to visit the pier but decided to go on a goldsinney hunt at Weymouth instead... saw just 2 mackerel and no garfish all day, you chose the best venue for food fish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the info Cpt annoyingly I won't be that way for a few months but will try it my way next time I float.
Were you able to catch your target fish?



As for the thanks everyone ? That was ment to be thanks everyone :)
 
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Thanks for the info Cpt annoyingly I won't be that way for a few months but will try it my way next time I float.
Were you able to catch your target fish?



As for the thanks everyone ? That was ment to be thanks everyone :)
yes, got the little rascal, and about 50 assorted corkwing, pout, tompots, pollack, scorpions and ballan that I was not after.. sometimes species hunting is like a finding a needle in a haystack.

the people you mentioned that were holding their floats at 15m out were not fishing at the depth they thought they were...especially if they had longish hook lengths below their weights.
 
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I fished the pier yesterday afternoon, just a gar or two had been caught but not many fishing. Got some little bites on the bait intended for a gar or mackerel so suspected sand smelt to be the culprits, was thinking to go down to the lower deck so that I could fish lighter floats out of the breeze and nearer the water... and a chap on the lower deck pulled out a small silver fish so my guess of sand smelt seemed to be correct.
Went down to the lower deck and set up using a size 14 hook and a tiny piece of gar fished about 8 feet deep and within 5 minutes had a sand smelt. I dropped the rig back into the water while I photographed the fish and when I returned the smelt saw that the float was feet under water and heading out to sea... a gar had taken the small offering a yard from the edge of the pier; the hook was out of sight and when I was looking for my disgorger the fish flipped over, shed the hook and dived cleanly through the gap in the decking boards entering the water below without a splash. The boards were laid with wider gaps in the last refurbishment, about an inch, if it had been last year it wouldn't have made it.
I moved down to fish the last half hour by the toilet block to see if there was a rockling, there was, some kids took one in a net baited with squid, in about a foot of water...but there were none to be had by rod and line.
Spent 4 hours later on the beach to the left of the Third Shelter, caught 5 small flounders and many spider crabs...no new species, was expecting/hoping for a shore rockling or a small school bass; normally you could catch plenty of both there... it was a lovely evening to be fishing though

100_0585.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Sounds like a good days fishing, shame about the Tom Daley of garfish escaping lol
I wish I could fish as much as you do,
 
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Sounds like a good days fishing, shame about the Tom Daley of garfish escaping lol
I wish I could fish as much as you do,
You will be able to, when you are old and grumpy...and not fit enough to fish many good shingle marks... but don't wish your life away.

Another interesting thing yesterday was a float drifting around not attached to any line that I could see but bobbing about at intervals and sometimes going against the flow. I cast over it with my bottom fishing 2 hook rig and after a few attempts was able to snag it and lift it to the top deck. The assemblage consisted of one knackered corkwing wrasse hooked through the cheek by one of a string of six huge, cod sized, feathers, about 20 yards of line stout enough to use as a shock leader, one shiny 20g drilled ball weight tied by a type of knot I've never seen before ( we used to call it a 'cobble' in Wiltshire dialect ) and a nice new float which was trapped between two beads held in place by the line being doubled back through them. Fish was returned to swim slowly away, the line went into the bin and the float, weight, and feathers retained to be used in more a conventional manner at some time.
I can only assume that the fish was amazed by the sight of such a rig and got close to make sure of what he'd seen, got too close and got pricked by the hook, dashed for cover and dragged the lot into one of many clumps of weed; the proud former owner of the gear pulled for a break ( must have arms like Popeye to break that line ) and the plucky little corkwing later towed the gear back out of the snag.
 
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