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The slags at Crofty

724 Views 14 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  SWFisherman
Hi,

I鈥檓 wondering if anyone can give me any up to date advice on fishing Crofty slags. Advice on tactics etc. is welcome (lure fishing) but primarily looking for someone who knows more about how the tide behaves down there, timings, and how to stay safe.

I was familiar with the area 30 years ago and know all too well the dangers, but it鈥檚 so different there these days. It used to be one main channel that would drain out through the gap. Simple as long as you understood the dangers and knew the tides. Now there鈥檚 huge pools the other side of the wall which almost look like they are filling up as the water drains from the main channel. It's enough to make me wary heading down there on my own.

Happy for anyone to DM as I鈥檝e been hesitant to even ask this question what with the dangers of the area and potentially encouraging anyone to head there who doesn鈥檛 know it. It鈥檚 so easy to not realise you鈥檝e been cut off by the tide and if that happens you鈥檙e in big trouble. That鈥檚 without mentioning any of the old nets and other things like that hidden underwater if you try and wade there. The best advice I can give anyone who doesn't know it well is to stay well away!

Thanks!
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I clicked on this thinking it was something else. 馃槀
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I clicked on this thinking it was something else. 馃槀
It's def an amusing name for those not familiar with them lol
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Fished there a few times last year after a 10 year gap and the changes are staggering there's not much left of a rock line largely covered in sediment only a foot or so of rocks sticking out. There is still a channel there so can be fished but I think it largely dries out on medium to large tides and not much water left on small tides at bottom. Usually plenty of life there on the surface but tends to be schoolies and mullet with flatties mainly autumn and winter. The pools are there and the ground is harder than it used to be in general so ok but there are still soft danger areas and small channels that can fill quickly with a rising tide so worth a reccy in daylight first and leave night fishing until you know the area or fish with someone else. There's probably a few on here that know it better as I don't fish it regularly usual lug rag peeler baits but crab do strip you this time of year. Tides and timings are probably key for this area as it has changed a lot over the years but I don't know it well enough really so my catches have been limited to schoolie and flatties tbh.
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Thanks to the person that DM'd. I would have replied but the conversation is not open to replies. Would probably have bugged with more questions too haha! Thanks anyway, any information is helpful.

Would still love to hear thoughts from anyone else too. Thank you!
Fished there a few times last year after a 10 year gap and the changes are staggering there's not much left of a rock line largely covered in sediment only a foot or so of rocks sticking out. There is still a channel there so can be fished but I think it largely dries out on medium to large tides and not much water left on small tides at bottom. Usually plenty of life there on the surface but tends to be schoolies and mullet with flatties mainly autumn and winter. The pools are there and the ground is harder than it used to be in general so ok but there are still soft danger areas and small channels that can fill quickly with a rising tide so worth a reccy in daylight first and leave night fishing until you know the area or fish with someone else. There's probably a few on here that know it better as I don't fish it regularly usual lug rag peeler baits but crab do strip you this time of year. Tides and timings are probably key for this area as it has changed a lot over the years but I don't know it well enough really so my catches have been limited to schoolie and flatties tbh.
Thanks for that, really helpful and appreciated. Yeah, the first stretch where the slags begin is almost covered. They are a bit more raised as you go further down. What really threw me is where you have some gaps in the wall as you head further down, where the water used to drain from behind them into the main channel, this week when I was walking there it was draining from what used to be the main channel into the pools on the land side of the rocks if that makes sense. Weirdly, it felt like the tide was rising even though it wasn't.
And yes, on a larger tide it does drain to not much at all in places. It looks more than it is but some of it is very shallow. Had a good recce earlier this week but didn't see any surface activity at all unfortunately. And yes, plenty of hard sand as there always has been but as you say, there'll still be some soft areas and that's the worry when heading down there alone and not being 100% familiar. Once the tide is coming in it comes at a fair pace there so if you're stuck then it's game over! And even if I knew it well I still wouldn't go near it in the dark - I've heard the stories of people not coming back from there i'm afraid.

Thanks again for the reply!
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Thanks for that, really helpful and appreciated. Yeah, the first stretch where the slags begin is almost covered. They are a bit more raised as you go further down. What really threw me is where you have some gaps in the wall as you head further down, where the water used to drain from behind them into the main channel, this week when I was walking there it was draining from what used to be the main channel into the pools on the land side of the rocks if that makes sense. Weirdly, it felt like the tide was rising even though it wasn't.
And yes, on a larger tide it does drain to not much at all in places. It looks more than it is but some of it is very shallow. Had a good recce earlier this week but didn't see any surface activity at all unfortunately. And yes, plenty of hard sand as there always has been but as you say, there'll still be some soft areas and that's the worry when heading down there alone and not being 100% familiar. Once the tide is coming in it comes at a fair pace there so if you're stuck then it's game over! And even if I knew it well I still wouldn't go near it in the dark - I've heard the stories of people not coming back from there i'm afraid.

Thanks again for the reply!
Yeah there is a few marks further down but not been down that far yet as a general rule on small tide you get about an hour and a half after bottom there even tho the water still looks like its draining when it reaches the level of the incoming tide its pretty quick and quicker on big tides again
Yeah there is a few marks further down but not been down that far yet as a general rule on small tide you get about an hour and a half after bottom there even tho the water still looks like its draining when it reaches the level of the incoming tide its pretty quick and quicker on big tides again
Yes, seen how quick it floods often enough when growing up. So quick on the bigger tides as you say.

Saw someone there today but they spent the whole time up their waist off the sand bank that ends shortly before the gap. I wouldn't fancy that myself as know in the past it's been possible to get tangled in old nets and things like that.

Further down is what I know as "the sands" and remember 40 odd years ago going there with my parents to put out rows of lines, like many locals did. Not aware anyone heads that direction apart from cockle pickers. A bit of a void in terms of people fishing from the until you hit Whiteford.
Seen a fox get caught out there. On a spring tide. Sad too say he didn't make it either. He knew he was in trouble as he frantically started running for the shore but it overwhelmed him. Sad too see.
Seen a fox get caught out there. On a spring tide. Sad too say he didn't make it either. He knew he was in trouble as he frantically started running for the shore but it overwhelmed him. Sad too see.
That's mad! So rare to see any wildlife out there other than birds. Even the horses who are pretty clever when it comes to navigating the tides never go out there (I suppose no grass so no reason either).
As someone who has walked from one side of the estuary to the other a bit further up and wading the main channel many years ago, there's not a chance I'd get in the water anywhere down near the gap.
I located the area in question on Google Earth - it looks a bit like the inner Dyfi Estuary but with a bigger tidal range and therefore more hazardous. Exploring the inner Dyfi needs caution. Shifting sandbanks and channels, patches of soft ground - you think you know the area then the following year it can be quite different again!
That's mad! So rare to see any wildlife out there other than birds. Even the horses who are pretty clever when it comes to navigating the tides never go out there (I suppose no grass so no reason either).
As someone who has walked from one side of the estuary to the other a bit further up and wading the main channel many years ago, there's not a chance I'd get in the water anywhere down near the gap.
I think he was tracking an injured gull. Hence his hazardous journey but as the tide made the gull simply floated away.
So this isn't about rough west Walians then !
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I think he was tracking an injured gull. Hence his hazardous journey but as the tide made the gull simply floated away.
If only animals could speak! To know what they would both be saying to each other in that moment haha!
So this isn't about rough west Walians then !
Ha I wonder how many views of this post are for something different to what was intended!!
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