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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi all,

started fishing basicly 9 years ago and pretty much worked out on my own that when the tides at its highest the feeding stops and when its the lowest it also stops would like for other ppls thoughts on this

most likely is common paratice to know this but im curious
 

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Hi Hart,

This topic is worthy of a book in its' own right. I generally agree with what you say, although the reasons why the bites dry up as tide slackens aren't clear cut. Some believe that it is harder for fish to follow-up a scent trail to your bait, others that fish come up off the bottom when the tide run eases.

Some venues, however, fish best at either low or high water. This may be for reasons that include access to deep water, or too powerful currents during the main run. The obvious example of a low water mark up here is Spurn Point, on the Bristol Channel, Sand Point and Hinckley, Black Rock etc... are all low water reef marks. In contrast the wall behind the Fort at Fort Victoria on the Isle of Wight tends to fish over high water. At a lot of these marks the main tide run is just too powerful for standard beach gear and even if you could fish enough lead to cope with the current there is often lots of floating weed to add to the problem.

Most venues have a hot couple of hours that produce the most fish through a full tide, but this period can actually change from venue to venue and from species to species at the same venue from year to year.

Generally, I find the first and last two hours of the flood a productive time at most of the venues I fish. The first hour of the ebb can also be a hot time, but often tends to bring a lot of weed with it especially in estuaries.

Hope this is of interest?

Nutty P.T.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks tench u seem to know what your talking about ....alot of helpful info there to ponder over saying that theres been the odd time that the fishings never stopped at my fav venue didnt matter which state of the tide it was and pretty much didnt change for afew days

thanks again

hart
 

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As a nipper my fishing days always seemed to become wrassing sessions when the fishing was slow. There was one spot that you only had to flick you rod out to and your bait would instantly be nibbled away at in seconds and you always kept the bait in the exactly the same place. This worked fantastically at keeping the boredom of an otherwise fishless day away but it was interesting to note that for a half hour period starting about 5mins before high or low water the bites would stop... not even a nibble and then it all burst back into life.
 

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it all depends on the venue and species your targetting.

alot of fish don't feed over the slack water, i would say that the main exceptions to this would be dogs and rays. it's all down to water craft, local knowledge and experience TBH.
 

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It has become obvious that fishing in the upper Bristol Channel, each mark has an optimum fishing period, ie. two hours before high, 1 hour before high, 1/2 hour before top, and generally follows the same time down. etc. etc.

The fish move from a low water area to a high water area (at the top of the tide) then move back again. The area hit depends on the food source available at that particular time.

So depending on where you fish depends on the time you will hit the fish.

Regarding stale mate at high water, I would hazard a guess that fish sense the lack of tidal flow, and realise they have to turn around before getting stranded.

This all makes sense in my locality, but probably doesn't figure in yours!

Best regards, Nick.
 

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"Regarding stale mate at high water, I would hazard a guess that fish sense the lack of tidal flow, and realise they have to turn around before getting stranded."

You sure about this one Nick m8?

The 'Nutty Professor'
 

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Showed my ignorance, didnt I !!! :doh:

"Regarding stale mate at high water, I would hazard a guess that fish sense the lack of tidal flow, and realise they have to turn around before getting stranded."

Post should have read.....


As the tide where I fish in the Bristol Channel is so strong, the fish move with it in search of their food. The high water period in the upper channel lasts for only a brief spell (a few minutes or so) after which the fish turn around and head back towards there low water holding ground (well they wouldn’t waste energy swimming against that strength of tide)
The fishing does kind of switch off for a short while, which fits in nicely with Prof T’s theory of the lack of scent trail with no water movement (in the muddy waters here scent trail is vitally important)



And the period of inactivity at high I’m sure has nothing to do with ‘stranded fish’, where that came from I have no idea!


But here is my excuse, and i'm sticking to it...........!

It didn't help that the whole while I was trying to reply to the post, the missus was banging on about the finer details of a holiday she'd booked for us, which i'd heard before and was ever so bored of. Trouble was she was asking questions 'what do you think?' etc. which required answers, and all the while i'm trying to gather my thoughts for the post. Needless to say the post suffered, and so did the relationship with the wife. Talking to her often makes me fell like a fish out of water (stranded fish perhaps?)


I AM NOT MULTI TASKING, I AM A BLOKE!


Mickey Mouse + Bristol channel – Goofy x tide strength / cod = argument + confused post

Best regards all, Nick (i think) :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Showed my ignorance, didnt I !!! :doh:




Post should have read.....


As the tide where I fish in the Bristol Channel is so strong, the fish move with it in search of their food. The high water period in the upper channel lasts for only a brief spell (a few minutes or so) after which the fish turn around and head back towards there low water holding ground (well they wouldn’t waste energy swimming against that strength of tide)
The fishing does kind of switch off for a short while, which fits in nicely with Prof T’s theory of the lack of scent trail with no water movement (in the muddy waters here scent trail is vitally important)



And the period of inactivity at high I’m sure has nothing to do with ‘stranded fish’, where that came from I have no idea!


But here is my excuse, and i'm sticking to it...........!

It didn't help that the whole while I was trying to reply to the post, the missus was banging on about the finer details of a holiday she'd booked for us, which i'd heard before and was ever so bored of. Trouble was she was asking questions 'what do you think?' etc. which required answers, and all the while i'm trying to gather my thoughts for the post. Needless to say the post suffered, and so did the relationship with the wife. Talking to her often makes me fell like a fish out of water (stranded fish perhaps?)


I AM NOT MULTI TASKING, I AM A BLOKE!


Mickey Mouse + Bristol channel – Goofy x tide strength / cod = argument + confused post

Best regards all, Nick (i think) :confused:
haha good post m8 wouldnt know about the wife thing as im not married but had enuff lasses messing with my head to know what your going on about ;p alot of nice info there about tides and biting habits cheers nick
 

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Hi Nick,

Loving it m8, and a very eloquent rebuttal I thought, women just don't understand when it comes to fishing do they? Bless 'em!

The 'slack water' phenomena is not a hard and fast rule either. When there is a good sea on up here, you will still catch cod when there is no tide run. When bassing at close range the very top of tide is often a hot period. I'm speaking here of ranges of 5-30 yards where the tide run is often negligible anyway. I think there has been some strong evidence for the 'come off the sea bed' theory, although I can't talk from real experience. I believe it was Dave Dowcra (see Thread if you don't know of him) who recounted details of catching Dabs off the bottom at high water from East Anglian beaches, but I could well be wrong (again?) on this?

Cheers, T
 

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Prof T, I quote you....

When bassing at close range the very top of tide is often a hot period

An interesting article found on the web, regarding Salmon fishing in British Columbia writes about the slack water period...........

Just before the tide reverses, which is known as slack water the feed fish come off the bottom to do their feeding when they don't have to fight the currents as much. This is when there is a real feeding frenzy among all fish. This is the best time to catch fish and a troller will get most of his days catch during the slack water periods which last about an hour each


Could this be why the Bass period is hot? the feed fish are off the bottom and the bass are on a feeding frenzy?

Also Dave Dowcra catching Dabs off the bottom, it sounds like the whole food chain (shrimps, bugs and all) comes up and parties!

If the trollers are having the bulk of there catch 'on slack water' I guess the fish off the bottom principle is the one to go with.

Have I made sense? cos I have a habit of confusing me and all others! :blahblah:
 

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Nick, when the bass fishing is slow you will nearly always take a fish bang on high tide! with nothing on the flood or ebb. I can't put my finger right on this habit buts its worth looking into?
 

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thanks tench u seem to know what your talking about ....alot of helpful info there to ponder over saying that theres been the odd time that the fishings never stopped at my fav venue didnt matter which state of the tide it was and pretty much didnt change for afew days

thanks again

hart
it depends on the venue. i,ll quote a couple you,ll know.

dabs on the heugh .... there will be more off the left hand side on an incoming tide then go quiet over the top. once the tide starts to go out you will find them off the right hand corner. over the top slack water they actually change position to suit the tide. this is not a hard fast rule but as someone who has fished hundreds of matches on there for them its generally true.

parton and staincliff. .... these will fish best over low tide and the first hour coming in. fish are pushed back into the holes where they feed over the slack until the tide pushes over shallow ground.

clayhole and crimdon. ... these fish best the last hour back and over low. you catch the fish as they are pushed back into the gullies. they sit in these gullies and will take baits until the tide starts to push back they they spread out and are harder to find.

so it really depends on the species and where your fishing for them.
 

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Dabcatcher,

I wish I fished in your area, the marks you mention and the fish habits in these areas is priceless. To all you who fish Heugh, Parton, Staincliff, Clayhole and Crimdon, take note and apply.


The marks you mention are many 100's of miles from me, but applies to my fishing in my area.

As I said in a rather confused post earlier in this thread, fish move from A to B (ie. from low water mark to high water mark) in search of food. Working out where they come from, and where they come to before turning around (without getting stranded!) is paramount to fishing success.


And Timtu, (Paddy) my fishing buddy!!! been pondering over your post.....

Nick, when the bass fishing is slow you will nearly always take a fish bang on high tide! with nothing on the flood or ebb. I can't put my finger right on this habit buts its worth looking into?
The slack water period in the Channel is tiny, wondered what the firk you were going on about, but i've just sussed it! it's that special place innit!!!!!! :secret:

Ciao all, Nick



PS - Hart 2002.....

haha good post m8 wouldnt know about the wife thing as im not married but had enuff lasses messing with my head to know what your going on about
Just wait till you get married, takes it to another dimension, honest!!!! Serious head firk. Plus wouldn't mind a few lasses messing with me head, HA!!:kissing:

Cheers Mate.
 

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Nick,

Too right m8, on those 14m Avonmouth jobbies, it's a case of blink and you miss it where high water slack is concerned, if I remember correctly. Tell your m8 Timtu that he is spot on re. ????? just don't get caught doing it! p.m. if I need to expand further please.

T
 

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Prof T, I quote you....




An interesting article found on the web, regarding Salmon fishing in British Columbia writes about the slack water period...........

Just before the tide reverses, which is known as slack water the feed fish come off the bottom to do their feeding when they don't have to fight the currents as much. This is when there is a real feeding frenzy among all fish. This is the best time to catch fish and a troller will get most of his days catch during the slack water periods which last about an hour each


Could this be why the Bass period is hot? the feed fish are off the bottom and the bass are on a feeding frenzy?

Also Dave Dowcra catching Dabs off the bottom, it sounds like the whole food chain (shrimps, bugs and all) comes up and parties!

If the trollers are having the bulk of there catch 'on slack water' I guess the fish off the bottom principle is the one to go with.

Have I made sense? cos I have a habit of confusing me and all others! :blahblah:


my dad worked with a boat that actually netted wrecks in the north sea. they laid there nets along the sea bed and over the wreck. the nets were set at 90 degrees to the tide.

the reason .......... they were after cod.

they had worked out that as the tide turned ling, pollock, coalies etc actually moved around the side of the wreck as the tide turned. the fish always sat on the down tide side of the wreck waiting for food. as the tide turned they went to the other side.

but..... cod actually went over the top of the wreck to change sides.

this resulted in massive catches of nearly all cod with only a few ling and other mixed bits.
 

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Prof T, I quote you....




An interesting article found on the web, regarding Salmon fishing in British Columbia writes about the slack water period...........

Just before the tide reverses, which is known as slack water the feed fish come off the bottom to do their feeding when they don't have to fight the currents as much. This is when there is a real feeding frenzy among all fish. This is the best time to catch fish and a troller will get most of his days catch during the slack water periods which last about an hour each


Could this be why the Bass period is hot? the feed fish are off the bottom and the bass are on a feeding frenzy?

Also Dave Dowcra catching Dabs off the bottom, it sounds like the whole food chain (shrimps, bugs and all) comes up and parties!

If the trollers are having the bulk of there catch 'on slack water' I guess the fish off the bottom principle is the one to go with.

Have I made sense? cos I have a habit of confusing me and all others! :blahblah:
dont assume by this that at every slack tide period your going to catch all your fish off the bottom.

this will mainly be in clear water. in dirty water the fish will still be grubbing along the bottom for food.
 

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Dabcatcher, good info on the trawlers.

Also, you say....

dont assume by this that at every slack tide period your going to catch all your fish off the bottom.

this will mainly be in clear water. in dirty water the fish will still be grubbing along the bottom for food.
I agree, earlier in this thread i posted.....

The fishing does kind of switch off for a short while, which fits in nicely with Prof T’s theory of the lack of scent trail with no water movement (in the muddy waters here scent trail is vitally important)
Timtu surprised me posting….

Nick, when the bass fishing is slow you will nearly always take a fish bang on high tide! with nothing on the flood or ebb. I can't put my finger right on this habit buts its worth looking into?

As the water is mucky his findings don’t fit in. But now I’m sure he’s talking of a place on the Channel where things are different from the norm!

Best regards, Nick
 
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