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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Following on from my thread asking for thoughts on the budget "Chinese" trailers I'd seen it might be of interest for anyone in a similar position to know what I did.

The dilemma was how much to spend on repairing/sourcing a trailer for my 13' Bonwitco. The options were quality new at £1000+, budget Chinese at £600 or so.... or repair mine. In the end the fact that my boat as an outfit has a ceiling price even if offered with a new galvanised trailer made me decide to repair it.



With the boat on it didn't look too bad but I would never have towed it any distance without some serious work. Once I got the boat off and presure cleaned the grease and gunk I could see that pretty well only the chassis and jockey wheel were any good.

Here is what I ordered to get it sorted... plus a new winch not shown. Total parts cost a whisker under £250. I got them from Towing&Trailers of Worksop via their website. In the past folks have given various suppliers they use for trailer spares but two things made me use these people. Their suspension units are branded Avonride and their roller brackets and U-bolts were all plated... some folks were mild steel with no protection.



Also in the picture is an old Sprite trailer snubbing post which I unbolted from a scrap trailer to fit to this one clamp-on style.

Here it is with all the grotty bits cut off. I also cut off all the welded on keel roller mounts plus the snubber post with the idea of putting all that lot back as clamp-on to give flexability of setting it up for this or a future boat.



And finally for now new suspension mounting plates welded and the new suspension, hubs, wheels and tyres fitted. After very careful calculation and weighing I worked out even with lots of kit and the inflatable/Tohatsu carried within the Bonwitco it would be fine with a 550kg gross rating.



It's almost finished now and I'll get a completed photo up when I find the camera.

David
 
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Nice job you have done there David.

I rebuilt my trailer as part of the winter refit project.

The only bits that I used from the old one were the keel and side rollers & brackets, the winch post and the mudguards & brackets.
The reason I kept the old mudguards was they are made from old tyres so they are flexible (especially when someone stands on them) plus they won't rust.

I made everything on the trailer adjustable and this was a really good idea as after the refit and with the new outboard on, I needed to move the axle back a bit.

I added 3 more keel rollers and a couple of guide posts to make it easier getting the boat back on the trailer if it was a bit windy.

Can't remember the cost of the rollers, brackets and a load of new U bolts, but the 60mm x 60mm box steel was £40 for a 7.6metre length and everything else (including new suspension units) was laying around in the workshop. I painted the whole trailer with 2 coats of galvafroid then sprayed it with a 2 pack paint that I had left over from a previous job.


Look forward to seeing the finished pictures :)

Malcolm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Cheers guys. Yes it would have looked great in silver Hammerite but the option of a hardly started grey gloss in the workshop won over on cost and in-stock grounds.

I do wonder Malcolm if one day you will get to the bottom of the things you find in the back of the workshop!! Having not long ago given up tractors etc I do have lots of part pots of all the familiar colours... John Deere green/yellow, Fergie grey, International red and so on. One day they'll run out and I'll be able to paint things in new colours!!

Anyway camera located so here is how it looks 95% complete.



I've had the boat on once to make sure I didn't set the mudguards too high and now they are done it's back on again with the outboard on the transom.

I'm going to fill the main and new aux fuel tanks and then check the trailer nose weight. I can feel already the whole thing will need to move forward a few inches... the joy of the new clamp-on fittings!

I've gone the other way with mudguards... the 30mm angle brackets locate in three places and together with the extra quality roll edged ones I bought they are strong enough to stand on.

There is another keel roller to fit ( I was short of a U-clamp) when I'll re-space them all. Also another U-bolt to go on the snubbing post.

I bought extra plates for the U-bolts so they can be used as spacers (until you run out of thread anyway... then individual bolts of the correct length will be needed) so that each keel roller gets exactly the same loading. By design my keel isn't straight and didn't sit on all the rollers previously. When I got the boat the roller with the highest loading was split down the middle.

David
 
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I do wonder Malcolm if one day you will get to the bottom of the things you find in the back of the workshop!!

David
I just hope that I don't have to move soon David..

I hate seeing things get thrown away so when I was in a previous job, if it was going in the skip and looked useful, I got a ticket to take it home.

:)
 

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Fenlander nice job done there mate ,bet your glad that you whent that way now. had a freind make me up a trailor for my 14ft dingy very simalar to yours it tows a treat we also fitted upright guide bars made out of 1in x1ins box and covererd them with some polypipe. made it so easy to load the boat well worth the little extra work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just a last image to show the boat on. Biggest hassle was shimming up the keel rollers so that they all took equal support. Lay on my back under the boat and eased it up with my kees to adjust each in turn.



Used the bathroom scales to set the towball weight by moving the boat a bit forward when the snubber clamps were loose.

David
 
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