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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:help:Guys, please do not laugh at me for this question! This is exactly the reason I joined this forum! To learn new things.
What is an "uptide rod " and a downtide rod" ?
What is the difference between the two?
What are they used for?
Anyone got pics showing the differences?

It is the first time in my 40+ years of fishing that I've heard of this.
 

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i know little about boat fishing, uptiding involves casting in the direction the tide is coming from and letting the tidal force anchor the lead weight, i think!, and down tiding is the opposite perhaps, as to the difference in rods who knows, from what i can see they look like shortened beach rods, 10-11 foot long, with casting ranges up to 10oz,
 

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Apparently no-one on this forum knows, hence the deafening silence !:doh:
Phew! You're a bit hasty aren't you :) Most of us were fishing or asleep last night...

So here goes. Uptide fishing was developed in the 60's I think when some anglers decided that when fishing in strong currents and shallows seas the noise of the water moving past the boat scared fish away. To overcome this we started casting 'up' the current away from the boat with lighter leads and letting a big loop of line out to drag a grip weight down onto the seabed to get a better hold.

The rods for this type of fishing had to be longer than the usual 6-8ft boat roads as we needed to be able to cast a weight from the deck of a boat in a similar way that shore fisherman do. However normal shore rods weren't really suitable for the job.

Uptide rods have developed these days into a strong rod with a very responsive tip. The strong butt and mid sections help with casting and handling big fish, and the responsive tip allows the boat to move on the waves without continually dragging out your lead from the bottom.

Downtide rods, normal boat roads, tend to be much shorter as you don't need the length to cast, also the action of the rod is generally continuous through the length to give you the ability the play and winch in bigger fish.

Hope this helps. I'm sure someone more technical can explain boat rod actions and ratings to you if you're interested - me? I just use them to catch fish :D
 

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Phew! You're a bit hasty aren't you :) Most of us were fishing or asleep last night...

So here goes. Uptide fishing was developed in the 60's I think when some anglers decided that when fishing in strong currents and shallows seas the noise of the water moving past the boat scared fish away. To overcome this we started casting 'up' the current away from the boat with lighter leads and letting a big loop of line out to drag a grip weight down onto the seabed to get a better hold.

The rods for this type of fishing had to be longer than the usual 6-8ft boat roads as we needed to be able to cast a weight from the deck of a boat in a similar way that shore fisherman do. However normal shore rods weren't really suitable for the job.

Uptide rods have developed these days into a strong rod with a very responsive tip. The strong butt and mid sections help with casting and handling big fish, and the responsive tip allows the boat to move on the waves without continually dragging out your lead from the bottom.

Downtide rods, normal boat roads, tend to be much shorter as you don't need the length to cast, also the action of the rod is generally continuous through the length to give you the ability the play and winch in bigger fish.

Hope this helps. I'm sure someone more technical can explain boat rod actions and ratings to you if you're interested - me? I just use them to catch fish :D
What he said. Uptide rods are 9.5-10ft long and used to cast uptide (towards the front of the boat) with gripper sinkers. The line is let out into a bow. A bite is signalled by taps on the rod or the rod springing back (slackliner). When a bite is registered, wind as fast as you can until you feel the weight of the fish then lift into it.....don't strike. This method also allows more people/rods to fish around the boat but was originall designed (as mentioned earlier) to fish away from the boat.

Downtide rods tend to be 6-8.5ft (the longer rods seem to be in favour now) and are used to fish from the back of the boat. Smooth sinkers are used and the weight is either cast off the back of the boat or in a tide can be just dropped down with the tide pulling it away from the boat. The line is usually taut to the weight. Bites are signalled by the usual tip shaking. Again, dont strike because there is so much stretch in mono it wont get to the hook unless fishing shallow water (some will disagree) but just wind and lift into the fish.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hahaha! My turn to apologise ! Sorry guys, I never took into account that I'm sitting on a different continent, let alone a different time zone !
Ok I get it now, it is just about fishing withe tide or stream or against it ! Thanks for the explanations ! it makes sense.
 
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That's kind of it, but boat casting (rather than just uptiding) is a complete science.

Why, where, when, what? Sometimes it can be far more successful than traditional boat fishing techniques and other times there is no need.
 
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