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Discussion Starter #1
Not used braid before can I use 100lb breaking strain straight through without the use of a shock leader casting a 5-6 or weight any opinions appreciated.
 

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The short answer yes.
If you're fishing on a beach you might prefer a thinner running braid, say 30lb and use 100 for leader.
 

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I use 4olb - 60lb with a shock leader, but I previously used 80lb. It was hard going in certain situations to break out a snag so I guess 100lb braid would be that bit more difficult?

Cheers
 

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What sized reel are you using to hold enough 100lb braid for the cast and possible big fish run. Personaly I use 20lb with 50-60lb leaders as my heaviest.

Thicker diameter line causes more resistance from wind, wave action and tide. With 20lb braid I would pretty much hold 4x more line than 100lb, it still allows me to use drag settings of 15lb or higher if needed, which is a hell of a lot of pulling power.
 

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Personally I'd never use 100lb braid.....what is it your hoping to catch ?
You could pull a Clydesdale horse to it's knees with that !
I fish a lot of rough ground areas, and find 60lb more than enough.
That's used on a pair of Abu 7500 C3 CT's.
Use lighter from clean ground, maybe 20/30lb on an Abu 6500 C3 CT Elite.
You'd struggle to break 100lb braid if you snagged.....not just that when your pulling for a break......the upper strands bed in through the reel.....recipe for a bird's nest, or crack off the following cast.
 

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There's also the potential to damage the rod and especially the reel if you try breaking out of a snag with such heavy line. If you were to be using any of the long range spin reels and the spool was at the point where the spool is furthest out from the reel and you tried to pull out of a snag, you could very easily break the reel. Multi's also don't handle dead pulls of 80-100lb to well either, so carry a tool such as a braid buster is you go heavy.

I know we've been down that path before where people mention their reason for such heavy line but a breakaway sinker and those light gauge hooks most people use should still pull out of heavy snags on light line. Hard coated mono will give far better abrasion protection than heavy braid and wrapping mono around your hand to drag a big ray or tope up the beach will be far less likely to cut your hands than braid.

Each to their own though, I'm simply working on a tried and tested formula I use around volcanic reefs covered with kelp, corals, and razor sharp oysters ( and big fish ). I also snorkel almost every area I fish to learne the terrain and species to target there, something I also did in the UK.
 

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i have used 100lb straight thru for years now, on hard grounds for cod , it works well for me and a great lead saver, i get a couple of seasons out of it from October to end of February having turned the line end for end after the first season is past , would not dream of going back to mono, when i come stuck its a simple turn around my arm and go for the pull
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys for all of your suggestions and advice will probably try out the 30lb main line to 60lb leader.
 

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It depends on whether you are using a Fixed spool or a multiplier. On a fixed spool I use 30-40lb braid with a shockleader. On a multiplier I use 65-100lb braid straight through, with 80lb being my favourite. I have used lighter braid on a multi but I find it beds in too easily leading to a birdie, so I avoid that now.
I never pull for a break directly on the rod or reel, usually I have a ‘priest’ to knock any fish on the head if I want to keep any for the pot, so I put the rod down and wrap the line around the priest half a dozen times. Braid doesn't stretch so its actually quite easy if you just take up the slack first and then lean into it, even 100lb.
Bendy hooks and breakout leads don't help on the type of rocky/kelpy ground I fish. I always use a rotten bottom and fixed grip leads on 80lb pulley rigs with 40 or 50lb hook lengths. When pulling for a break its quite common that the rig body snaps, not the rotten bottom or the hook length, I guess thats because it gets wrapped around kelp.
 

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It depends on whether you are using a Fixed spool or a multiplier. On a fixed spool I use 30-40lb braid with a shockleader. On a multiplier I use 65-100lb braid straight through, with 80lb being my favourite. I have used lighter braid on a multi but I find it beds in too easily leading to a birdie, so I avoid that now.
I never pull for a break directly on the rod or reel, usually I have a ‘priest’ to knock any fish on the head if I want to keep any for the pot, so I put the rod down and wrap the line around the priest half a dozen times. Braid doesn't stretch so its actually quite easy if you just take up the slack first and then lean into it, even 100lb.
Bendy hooks and breakout leads don't help on the type of rocky/kelpy ground I fish. I always use a rotten bottom and fixed grip leads on 80lb pulley rigs with 40 or 50lb hook lengths. When pulling for a break its quite common that the rig body snaps, not the rotten bottom or the hook length, I guess thats because it gets wrapped around kelp.

Why do you think the braid digs in differently between a multi and spin, this seems very odd to me. Before I went totally over to spin I had a couple of Daiwa slosh reels, several abu's and some penn ( small multi's) all with 20-30lb braid. I never had an issue of braid burying into the spool on any of them, even after doing battle with very big stingrays and sharks.

Even offshore deep dropping for sword fish and other deep dwelling species Ive never had braid bury into its self. Targeting swords we use pieces of concrete or a couple of bricks to get our baits 700m + down. These are broken off when our baits reach the correct depths and often retrieved with only the weight of the bait and deep water flashing lights and yet still doesn't bury in.

The UK sharking lads I took out for a week after Xmas, once again used braid on their sharking reels, which were regularly retrieved with very little resistances. Most of my preferred fishing is either micro jigs or soft plastics, where my line of 10-15lb might get retrieved with just a 4-10g weight from depths of 50-80m. Even this style of fishing doesn't result in line digging into the spool.

I don't understand why this is happening for you and why the difference between reels.
 

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I’ve never had braid bed on a multiplier from a boat or my kayak, its only ever a potential problem shore casting, and that is what the question is about. With a reel at full revs it only takes a slight catch for it to go pear shaped. Fixed spool just doesn't birdie the same way because the spool is .......fixed. The constant line lay of a fixed spool helps as well.
 

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I’ve never had braid bed on a multiplier from a boat or my kayak, its only ever a potential problem shore casting, and that is what the question is about. With a reel at full revs it only takes a slight catch for it to go pear shaped. Fixed spool just doesn't birdie the same way because the spool is .......fixed. The constant line lay of a fixed spool helps as well.
Sorry didn't make myself clear, the Daiwa slosh's, penn and abu's were all used on the beach, these aren't considered boat reels here. Never had any problem as mentioned.
 

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Sorry didn't make myself clear, the Daiwa slosh's, penn and abu's were all used on the beach, these aren't considered boat reels here. Never had any problem as mentioned.
Think you have done well Jon....not having any issues....

Braid is much more unforgiving with a duff cast....mainly resulting a bit of bedding in of the line as mentioned by spanner....

Can be a right pain to get it sorted out and the line lay level again....

Cheers ken
 

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I’ve never had braid bed on a multiplier from a boat or my kayak, its only ever a potential problem shore casting, and that is what the question is about. With a reel at full revs it only takes a slight catch for it to go pear shaped. Fixed spool just doesn't birdie the same way because the spool is .......fixed. The constant line lay of a fixed spool helps as well.
I've never had braid "bed in" from a boat either. I fish in Norway fairly regularly......from boat and shore, around Boda and Tromso.
When hauling in halibut, big cod and the such like it's fine.
But I think a different set of rules applies from the boat as opposed to the shore.
It's more of a straight up and down affair from the boat...... easier to control the tension on the line, and the resistance. Less likely braid will bed in......and not as if you need much of a cast from the boat.
Think the issue occasionally arises when you've had to pull for a break when your snagged.
From the shore it's more of a horizontal tension, when you pull for a break.
I've seen some that just put their thumb on the spool, and walk backwards.
Inevitably it's going to bed in doing that. The following cast........well, could be hit or miss !!
I find wrapping out around my arm......even across my back eliminates the chance of braid bedding in...or at least reduces the chance.
 

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It would be interesting to find how many people have actually had this happen from the shore, like I said I simply haven't from shore or offshore. I do use a bees knees tensioning tool to load all my reels with an exact constant tension when loading with new braid. Getting snagged, landing big stingrays or sharks from the shore or trying direct pulls simply doesn't bed, I wonder if it could be down to different line laying styles.


I can't get my head around why shore or boat would make any difference at all, or why a 90 or 45 degree angle compared to a direct pull would make any difference. The braid is guided accross the rod rings the same at all rod angles.
 

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It would be interesting to find how many people have actually had this happen from the shore, like I said I simply haven't from shore or offshore. I do use a bees knees tensioning tool to load all my reels with an exact constant tension when loading with new braid. Getting snagged, landing big stingrays or sharks from the shore or trying direct pulls simply doesn't bed, I wonder if it could be down to different line laying styles.


I can't get my head around why shore or boat would make any difference at all, or why a 90 or 45 degree angle compared to a direct pull would make any difference. The braid is guided accross the rod rings the same at all rod angles.
I'm speculating.....but I would imagine quite a few people have had that problem.
As you say, could be different styles of loading a reel......having it too tight ....not tight enough.,...poor quality braid. "Only get what you pay for"!!
A debate that may never be solved.....how longs a piece of string.....or braid in this case !
The braid is guided across the rod rings at different angles......but the inertia is different as the angle changes .......along with the force applied.
Ultimately though......at least from the shore, when snagged .....it may be the technique used when trying to pull for a break and free the snag that's the problem.
Who knows ??
 
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