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Discussion Starter #1
1. rain - does it affect catches (not de-salination but the noise it might create)
2. thunder/lightning - same again (not sure if large pointy stick/metal tripod a good idea?)
3. wind - big white tops off shore but calmer close in - do the fish stay out??
 

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All three affect my fishing mate, that's when the beer kitty comes out.
:)
 

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as regards to number 2...

you definatly wanna watch the rod(s)..carbon fibre..likes the ole electric...i think id definatly go home sharpish if a thunder storm broke out...

High winds can play havoc when casting..looping a line all over the place..and bite detection is a nightmare..Rods do tend to go a bit "epileptic" during strong winds,,

rough seas would pretty much make me not bother too..depends how rough though...
 

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digit said:
1. rain - does it affect catches (not de-salination but the noise it might create)
2. thunder/lightning - same again (not sure if large pointy stick/metal tripod a good idea?)
3. wind - big white tops off shore but calmer close in - do the fish stay out??
1. Rain - if your mark has a river going into the sea then heavy rain will definately affect the fishing with all that extra fresh water which you can often see as it is brownish. Avoid marks close to any estuaries if it's rained loads.

2. Thunder/lightning - same point regarding extra fresh water, but I would NEVER go shore or boat fishing if thundery activity expected. I do a lot of research on convective storms and you don't wanna mess with them. Apart from the obvious lightning risk, they can produce very strong gusty winds out of nowhere, which is why mariners often refer to them as squalls. These can be incredibly hazardous to small craft. The UK also experiences quite a few tornadoes each year associated with such storms....see www.torro.org.uk for more.

3) I find this depends on the depth of the mark. Shallow sandy beaches get clouds of sand in the water if it's too blowy and the fish don't like this so they tend to move out a little. I don't see so much of a problem with more shelving beaches when it may actually bring the fish on the feed. Always seems best though after a gale when the sea's calming down after a good stir-up, so the fish come in looking for any food disturbed.

Cheers - John
 
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