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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone try it, over slack water for example. I'm sure landing them isn't an issue, just getting the lure down there. Fancy a bit of a different challenge.
 

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With a name like Toonfish you must be from the North East. We usually fish the cheap Fladen jellyworms over the inshore wrecks and reefs. Simplest method is to fish the jellyworm on a flowing trace,
I use 3-4ft trace, (some people prefer longer) and enough lead to get to the bottom. As you near the wreck or reef begin to wind in slowly, you'll feel the fish plucking at the worm, don't strike, keep reeling in, when the fish finally takes your rod will bend over, then the fun begins.:)
 

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You'll need a slow drop at slack or get spin ups. The faster the flow the easier/quicker the drop thats' possible. Any really light lure - like the jelly worm - works well at slower flow.

Another option is to switch to pirking/jig with a light rod+jig during slack.

With a 20-60g spinning rod and 20lb line, I found that you'll get a window with 3-5oz.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
With a 20-60g spinning rod and 20lb line, I found that you'll get a window with 3-5oz.
that's the kind of thing I was thinking, wondered if even one of the big fiiish black minnows would get down there, I think they're about 60g - in theory they would, if tide not too strong
 

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that's the kind of thing I was thinking, wondered if even one of the big fiiish black minnows would get down there, I think they're about 60g - in theory they would, if tide not too strong
Probably better with a 3-5oz lead to keep it vertical and then have a lure behind.

I have a set of larger jig head lures (40g IIRC) that I want to try with a 3oz lead but unfortunately last trip out was blown out by the wind. The issue is that with a slow tide, the distance the lure has to travel (i.e. depth) means it can move quite a distance so with the lead just keeps it a little more controlled.
 

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Saw some guys doing this off a boat in wreck in the spring last year. There were just 4 on the boat so they had lots of space. They were casting weighted shads ahead of the boar drift so the boat would catch up with the lure to give them best chance of hitting the wreck. They were using light spinning rods and fairly small fixed spool reels (3000 to 4000) sort of size.

They were probably not hitting as many fish as standard tactics but the ones they did get looked infinitely more fun!
 
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Saw some guys doing this off a boat in wreck in the spring last year. There were just 4 on the boat so they had lots of space. They were casting weighted shads ahead of the boar drift so the boat would catch up with the lure to give them best chance of hitting the wreck. They were using light spinning rods and fairly small fixed spool reels (3000 to 4000) sort of size.

They were probably not hitting as many fish as standard tactics but the ones they did get looked infinitely more fun!
Casting with lures and pirks too - so you arrive at the wreck with the line straight down.

Probably want something a bit beefier than a Hyperloop 4000 with a Ling on :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Saw some guys doing this off a boat in wreck in the spring last year. There were just 4 on the boat so they had lots of space. They were casting weighted shads ahead of the boar drift so the boat would catch up with the lure to give them best chance of hitting the wreck. They were using light spinning rods and fairly small fixed spool reels (3000 to 4000) sort of size.

They were probably not hitting as many fish as standard tactics but the ones they did get looked infinitely more fun!
It's feasible then, I will give it a go and accept all the p~~~ taking that will come with it!
 

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Another one to try you need to wait fortune summer when the pollack are on the inshore wrecks in shallower water. We've tried a couple times where you anchor up tide of the wreck then drop a standard flying collar rig with a jelly worm back to the wreck. Work it like you would if you are on the drift but after the fourth retrieve come all the way back and start again. When the tide starts to drop to a small enough flow I've manage to use an HTO rockfish 7-28g LRF rod with just 2oz of lead on the rig and had Pollack to 8lbs which go berserk! Rod is paired with a cheap shimano Katana 2500 which works fine.

If you be got space you can also try a small Dexter wedge cast 'up tide' style so it can get down to the wreck in stronger tides. Our skipper had 5 species on this method year before last - even got a bream to take it.

Need room on the boat for this type of work though
 
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I find its more the wind speed / direction that governs the amount of lead required than the actual tide. Last summer, on the days little or no wind (distant memory now) I was only using 5 or 6oz to fish evos and the line was only at a slight angle in 160 to 200ft of water. This was when the tide was running, so 6lb class gear was great for the Pollack. The lighter leads do take longer to get to the bottom - but that is no bad thing with lures. When being pushed by the wind then 10oz became essential to find the fish.
The other technique that proved effective - a small speed jig rigged with assist hooks, wound up very quickly, stopped and then wound again, the Pollack hit that so fast that you could hear the braid in the rings on the crash dives.
 

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Hi Nick, that is a nice little Video, I am pleased to see that light line boat vertical lure fishing is "coming of age" I was doing this quite a few years ago now, back around 1998/2000, catching Cod on 10/20lb equivelent spinning rod and braid/ fixed spool reel using a 6 oz pirk with assist hooks, when all around me were either blanking with big Pirks, or Shadding with a pound of lead and 30/50 lb setups...
I remember the first time I tipped up with the "wand", the crewman looked at me in disbelief, but soon changed his mind after netting a few Cod for me.
Light line fishing crosses over to other species, I have had Tope , 60 lb plus, on the same gear, as well as the more usual Ray, Wrasse, Huss, Bass, even had Conger in the Bristol Channel when uptiding with the same line and reel but using a very light quiver tip uptide rod, made by Abu ( not now available ).

Dave
 

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Ullo Toon,
I guess it depends on the boat; if it's full or there's a big tide ripping through you'll be Billy No-mates if you tangle everyone else. You can get lighter jigs and pirks (150-200g) that'll be usable on a reasonable spinning rod, but why not just keep it simple and try using a 6-12lb boat rod that'll be able to handle the weight you need to get down without tangling everyone, and still give great sport on any decent fish?
 
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